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Picture Trade: How to be a wiz at WITS trade data visualizations

Siddhesh Kaushik's picture

Ever needed to know exactly how much a country exports or imports of a product? How about which trade partners are most important to a country? Or how those relationships and patterns of trade have changed over time?
 
There is now an easy way to get this picture using the WITS Country Analysis Trade Data Visualization tool. Here's how it works. In the visualization below, select a country, a year, whether you want trade flow data for imports or exports, and whether you want to view the data by partner country or by product.

Below these options is a slider, which shows the number of partners/products in the data set. You can adjust this slider to focus on any range of numbers. Say, for example, you are interested in only the top 10 partners, then you can set the slider from 1-10 to view only the top 10-- or slide it in the other direction to see the smallest trade partners. Happy exploring, and post your comments if you find something interesting!

 

WITS Country Analysis Trade Data Visualization


You can explore this and more advanced visualizations in the WITS Trade Visualizations page. To see how these visualizations can help tell stories in more interesting ways, check out our recent blog on fuel prices that uses the Product Analysis visualization.

Comments

Submitted by Commentator on

It is good to see the world bank trying to improve their visualization tools, but this project looks like an incomplete version of MIT's observatory of economic complexity (atlas.media.mit.edu), which has been out for nearly five years. The questions is why wouldn't the world bank team up with those who have more experience and better technology than them.

​Thanks for your comment. The MIT site is, indeed, quite a sophisticated tool. We would be happy to talk about teaming up with them or anyone else who has more experience and better technology! I'll reach out separately to discuss any ideas you might have on how to do that.

Sincerely,
Julia Oliver
Online Communications Officer

Submitted by Commentator2 on

Unfortunately, despite a good effort on visualization front, MIT's observatory of economic complexity is not being updated and displays old trade data from 2014. WITS already shows 2015 trade data. Major changes in international trade happened in 2015 and the most recent data is what now matters the most.
The ultimate source of the most recent trade data (up to monthly series into 2016!) is Trademap (www.trademap.org). It also features amazing vizualisations via interactive charts & maps. The product detail of data is ridiculous: down to a tariff-line level (for example, "household refrigerators, compression-type" or "dried mangoes") And most of its features are FREE!

Submitted by Commentator2 on

Unfortunately, despite a good effort on visualization front, MIT's observatory of economic complexity is not being updated and displays old trade data from 2014. WITS already shows 2015 trade data. Major changes in international trade happened in 2015 and the most recent data is what now matters the most.
The ultimate source of the most recent trade data (up to monthly series into 2016!) is Trademap (www.trademap.org). It also features amazing vizualisations via interactive charts & maps. The product detail of data is ridiculous: down to a tariff-line level (for example, "household refrigerators, compression-type" or "dried mangoes") And most of its features are FREE!

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