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  • Reply to: How should a city administration respond to the shared cab phenomenon?   1 week 18 hours ago

    Martin, thanks for your comments. We do not have any fundamental disagreement with what you say. Indeed, the framework we lay out precisely tries to move from the kinds of regulatory frameworks you describe to one that is based on market –based competition, no artificial barriers to entry and regulation of well defined elements of public interest.
    With respect to the issue of existing congestion charging schemes excluding cabs – it is not clear to us what any a priori reason to exclude cabs from a pricing regime would be. Indeed, as we move into a world of autonomous cars and mobility-on-demand some suspect the already blurry line between private cars and shared services such as Uber will become even more blurred. But we do agree that any pricing regime should not be limited to cabs – that said, the nature of the emerging shared taxi services and the data they collect may offer a nice bite sized vision of what the world of tomorrow could look like to an urban planner.

  • Reply to: How should a city administration respond to the shared cab phenomenon?   1 week 19 hours ago

    Yang. Thanks for your comments. You bring up important concerns – the issues you list re privacy and safety are important considerations for a new regulatory regime. Your point with respect to the people who don’t use cellphones is also well taken though the evidence suggests that smartphone penetration is growing fast, especially among the middle class who would be using taxis. Additionally, this is one of the gaps that one would hope public transport would fill.

  • Reply to: How should a city administration respond to the shared cab phenomenon?   1 week 19 hours ago

    Lies, Thanks for your comment. No disagreement that many of our clients, or indeed even most cities in the global North are not handling congestion management as yet in a systematic manner. However, shared taxis and network-based services such as Uber and Easycab already have a big presence in many of the cities the Bank works in – including all major cities in Latin America and China. Government is also responding to these services and we would suggest that the framework we lay out could help them think through their decisions in such a context.

  • Reply to: Roads and the Environment: Lessons from the Yiba Expressway   1 week 2 days ago

    Hi Chris, thanks for sharing this remarkable experience.

  • Reply to: Roads and the Environment: Lessons from the Yiba Expressway   1 week 2 days ago

    I dont see any mention of "green bridges" or overpasses specially designed for connectivity of wildlife migration. It seems that it might be particularly relevant given the location but these are becoming common internationally even when highways are not passing through known protected areas.