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Andrew Stott

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Andrew Stott
Andrew Stott was Director for Transparency and Digital Engagement for the United Kingdom (UK) Government. He led the work to open up government data and create "data.gov.uk," and after the 2010 Election he led the implementation of the new Government's commitments on Transparency of central and local government, including delivery of the Prime Minister's personal pledges to release key finance and staffing data within the Government's first six months in office. His role also included responsibility for increasing the Government's capability to use new media to communicate and collaborate with the public, including the crowd-sourcing of ideas for spending reductions and increasing civil liberties and the greater use of the major social media platforms include Facebook and Twitter.
 
Following his retirement in December 2010, he continues to advise UK Ministers on the release of government data and other parts of their e-government programme as a member of the UK Public Sector Transparency Board, as well as advising other governments and contributing to the international development of the Open Data agenda. As a senior consultant in the Transport and ICT Global Practice in the World Bank, he has worked on Open Data and other e-Government issues in countries including Moldova, Macedonia, Russia, Georgia, Botswana, Tanzania, Rwanda, Antigua, St Lucia and Indonesia, as well as on global Open Data strategy and co-authoring the Open Data Readiness Assessment methodology. He is also on the Advisory Council of the Open Knowledge Foundation and of Open Corporates, the open database of the corporate world.
 
Between 2004 and 2009, Stott was UK Government Deputy Chief Information Officer and Chair of the UK Government Chief Technology Officers Council. He joined the UK civil service in 1976 and subsequently worked in a variety of UK public sector bodies in policy, finance, program management and in both strategy and implementation roles in information technology. He is a graduate of the University of Cambridge, where he studied both Mathematics and Law.