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December 2010

Corruption Hunters send a clear signal: We will step up the global action

Dina Elnaggar's picture

This has been a very busy time for the global anti-corruption community as they geared up to the discussions of actions and priorities at the first meeting of the International Corruption Hunters Alliance (ICHA). For the the 234 Corruption Hunters who participated in the meeting last week, the experience was very rewarding. Many of them had never met before; a challenge that this World Bank-supported Alliance will help them overcome. But it is not the only challenge that these Corruption Hunters face. Your blog comments and their experiences reveal many more. The good news, this meeting acknowledged all and defined the priorities for action. So now is the time to thank you for sending your comments. I would also like to invite you to learn more about what went on during the ICHA meeting
 

Balancing individual and corporate accountability for corruption

Recently, many in the community concerned about international corruption have begun to discuss the need to hold individuals responsible criminally for their actions.  While people have long discussed the failure to hold high-profile bribe recipients responsible, now the discussion has mutated to the bribe payer side.  Lower-level targets are certainly more easily prosecuted than the rich and powerful.  After all, corruption, like most crimes, is committed by people, not by companies, machines or cultures.  Some countries, most notable the U.S., have brought an increasing number of cases against individuals directly involved in paying or authorizing bribes.

Monitoring for results: an accessory or ingredient on reform agendas?!

Francesca Recanatini's picture

We have received a few comments to the blog we posted last week and we want to take this opportunity to thank our contributors.  The examples provided and issues raised highlight both the on-going efforts that are happening at the country level and the need to learn from these efforts.  The on-going discussion also raises some additional questions: