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#GlobalDev: What Caught Your Attention in 2014?

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What fascinated people most about global development in 2014?  A look at the most popular World Bank Group content on social media and the web may offer some insight. We’ve compiled a selection of the Bank’s top 10 most liked, viewed, and favorited posts on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, YouTube, and the web. Have a look and tell us your top development issues of 2014.

Videos
The Bank’s most-watched video featured Chief Economist Kaushik Basu explaining shared prosperity.

Technology, Mobile Phones Aid Quest to Make Everyone Count

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Also available in: العربية | Español | Français

Patients and a nurse in a Cambodia hospital. © Chhor Sokunthea/World Bank

Having an identity is part of living in a modern society, and the key to accessing public services, bank accounts, and jobs. But how should developing countries with tight budgets go about building a national system that records births and deaths and establishes identities?

A panel including representatives from Ghana, Moldova, and Canada explored that question and related issues Friday at Making Everyone Count: Identification for Development, during the World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings. The event was live-streamed in Arabic, English, French, and Spanish and moderated by Kathy Calvin, president and CEO of the United Nations Foundation.

A Public-Private Push for Infrastructure and ‘Inclusive Growth’

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Also available in: العربية | Français

Swiss Re Group Chief Investment Officer Guido Fürer, European Investment Bank President Werner Hoyer, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, and Australian Treasurer and Chair of the G20 Finance Track Joe Hockey at the signing ceremony for the Global Infrastructure Facility. © Simone D. McCourtie/World Bank

The idea of “Inclusive growth” and how to achieve it was talked about a lot in the days ahead of the 2014 World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings. Among the solutions on the table was a new initiative that could help unlock billions of dollars for infrastructure and improve the lives of many.

About 1.2 billion people live without electricity and 2.5 billion people don’t have toilets. Some 748 million people lack access to safe drinking water. The Global Infrastructure Facility (GIF) announced by World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim this week hopes to lower these numbers by developing a pipeline of economically viable and sustainable infrastructure projects that can attract financing.

Ebola-Stricken Countries Appeal for Help as Nations Gather for Annual Meetings

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Leaders of the three hardest-hit countries in West Africa issued a plea for help battling Ebola at a high-level meeting on the crisis Thursday on the eve of the World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings.

China’s Yang Lan Asks How to Help the Have-Nots

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Poverty may be falling, but 1 billion people still live in extreme poverty. Inequality is growing everywhere. What is the World Bank Group doing about this?

The World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim and World Bank Chief Economist Kaushik Basu had some answers in a live-streamed conversation, Building Shared Prosperity in an Unequal World, with Chinese media entrepreneur Yang Lan in the lead-up to the institution’s Annual Meetings on Wednesday morning.

2014 Annual Meetings Guide to Webcast Events

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How can economic growth benefit more people? What will it take to double the share of renewables in the global energy mix? Will the world have enough food for everyone by 2050? You can hear what experts have to say on these topics and others, ask questions, and weigh in at more than 20 webcast events from Oct. 7 to 11. That's when thousands of development leaders gather in Washington for the World Bank-International Monetary Fund Annual Meetings. Several events will be live-blogged or live-tweeted in multiple languages. You can also follow the conversation on Twitter with #wblive and other hashtags connected to events. We’ve compiled a sampling of events and hashtags below.  Check out the full schedule or download the Annual Meetings app for Apple devices and Android smartphones.

Making the Case for Universal Health Coverage

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UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, and Nigerian Finance Minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala at the Toward Universal Health Coverage by 2030 forum. © Simone D. McCourtie/World Bank

With people around the world struggling to afford health care, countries as diverse as Myanmar, Nigeria, Peru, Senegal, Kenya, South Africa, and the Philippines are warming to the idea of universal health coverage. This growing momentum was the subject of a high-profile Spring Meetings event examining the case for universal health coverage and the steps to get there.

Some 70 governments have asked the United Nations for help to achieve universal health coverage, said Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. He spoke at Toward Universal Health Coverage by 2030, co-sponsored by the World Bank and World Health Organization and moderated by the WHO Director-General Margaret Chan.

“We can celebrate the fact that virtually all mothers in Sweden survive childbirth,” Ban said. “But in South Sudan, one in seven pregnant women will not live to see their babies. Addressing this inequality is a matter of health and human rights … To secure health, we have to take preventive action. The concept of universal health coverage could be an important catalyst.”

Ban was part of a panel including World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim; Harvard University President Emeritus Lawrence H. Summers; Nigeria Minister of Finance Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala; and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, now the U.N. Special Envoy for Cities and Climate.

In a Rapidly Changing World, Governments Need to Make Education a Priority

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UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, left, and World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, right, pose with education campaigners Shazia Ramzan and Kainat Riaz, who were caught up in the Pakistan gun attack on Malala Yousafzai and are in Washington to lobby for greater educational access. Photo: Roxana Bravo/World Bank

The world needs to step up efforts to educate large numbers of young people to meet the challenges of the 21st century. That was a key message at the Learning for All Symposium, Investing in a Brighter Future, at the IMF-World Bank Spring Meetings.

The event, moderated by PBS News Anchor Judy Woodruff and webcast in three languages, linked what several participants described as an ongoing “learning crisis” with high unemployment among young people worldwide.

While a lot of progress has been made getting children into school, 57 million are still out of school. Studies have found that education gaps are impeding skills development, economic growth, and competitiveness around the world. In 2011 it was estimated that 73 million young people were unemployed globally. Youth employment rates are two to four times as high as those of adults in most countries.

Inequality Is Theme of Al Jazeera Interview

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 Simone D. McCourtie / World Bank

In a wide-ranging conversation, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim and Al Jazeera’s Ali Velshi kept returning to a topic that has been rising in importance as it worsens in the world – inequality.

Velshi, the host of a nightly business news program on Al Jazeera America, asked is the middle class growing worldwide? Is it healthy? Does solving inequality require redistribution of wealth? How can the World Bank Group make headway on ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity when there are so many obstacles?

2014 Spring Meetings Guide to Webcast Events

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Also available in: العربية | Español | Français
The global economy and international development will be front and center April 8-13, when thousands of development leaders come to Washington for the IMF-World Bank Spring Meetings. Tune in to the conversation at 25 World Bank Live interactive webcasts on topics including digital finance, Syrian art, universal health care, and the global movement to end poverty. Several events will be in multiple languages. You can also follow the conversation on Twitter. We’ve listed some highlights below; check out the full schedule of events. 

Wednesday, April 9


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