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Post Questions, Share Your Story: How Have You Overcome Risk?

Lauren Clyne Medley's picture

Available in Français

Gomez family faces risk: Unemployment, Inflation, Civil Conflict

When pursuing new opportunities, expected and unexpected risks can rise up. From personal health issues to economic hardship and natural disasters, any number of risks can create barriers on the pathway to success for individuals, families, businesses, and entire countries.

Join a live chat on March 27 at 9:30 ET with the team of the upcoming "World Development Report 2014: Managing Risks for Development." The discussion will look at risk management and its impact on development and poverty reduction around the world.

Talking to 4,000 Women & Men about Gender: What Surprised Us Most

Stacy Morford's picture

In a new study on gender equality, researchers asked 4,000 people in 20 countries to describe the gender norms in their communities and the influence those norms have on their lives and their every-day decisions. The researchers spoke with men and women, youth and adults, living in villages and cities in developing countries, as well as higher income countries.

Here, three of the researchers describe their most memorable experiences from the interviews and the findings that surprised them the most.

Citizen Engagement in Development Projects: What We Know, What We Need to Do and Learn

Caroline Anstey's picture
Also available in: العربية

Read this post in Español, Français

Remember the old saying "the customer is always right"? The motto used by a number of prominent retailers (like Marshall Field) was all about placing value on customer satisfaction. In essence it was about listening to the customer – the final point person at the end of the retail line.

Today we are seeing business build far more sophisticated means of using modern technology to get feedback from their customers. It begs the question – if business can do that, why can't we try and do the same in the business of development - with the benefit of modern technology?

I've seen the evidence that we can do it. Last October at the World Bank, we applauded the work of teams in Bangladesh, Brazil, Cambodia and India, who've been using the mix of modern technology and development to boost results.

Citizen Engagement - Seven Questions, One Conversation

Tiago Carneiro Peixoto's picture

Read this post in: Español

Citizen Voices

Calls for increased citizen empowerment are heard from across the spectrum, ranging from governments and donors to CSOs and multilateral efforts such as the Open Government Partnership.

The World Bank Group, in partnership with CIVICUS, the Government of Finland and InterAction will host a conference on citizen engagement on March 18, 2013 to highlight the value of engaging with citizens for effective development.

The Citizen Voices conference will focus on citizen engagement and feedback systems that strengthen the quality of policy making and service delivery, where the impact on the poor is most direct. The conference aims to explore how citizen engagement is essential for effective development, move from knowledge to action, and establish concrete partnerships for scaling up at global and national levels.

But while the claims for citizen engagement abound, less discussion is dedicated to how to design and implement participatory processes that deliver their expected benefits, such as increased accountability and better delivery of policies and services. As part of this problem, not enough attention is paid to the various outcomes that participatory processes may engender and what they mean for policy and development.

What Will It Take to Achieve Gender Equality? Replay Live Chat

Lauren Clyne Medley's picture

Available in Spanish

International Women's Day ChatIn celebration of International Women's Day on March 8, the World Bank hosted a live web chat with gender specialists from around the world.

For just over an hour, World Bank Vice President of Sustainable Development Rachel Kyte joined World Bank Director of Gender and Development Jeni Klugman along with the authors of the report "On Norms and Agency" to discuss how women and men overcome the challenges posed by gender norms.

Enhancing Women’s Voice & Empowerment

Jeni Klugman's picture

A vendor stands next to her wares in East Timor. Alex Baluyut/World Bank

On March 5, just before International Women’s Day, we mark the launch of On Norms and Agency: Conversations about Gender Equality with Women and Men in 20 Countries. This book is the result of an important partnership between the World Bank and the Rockefeller Foundation, and of vital qualitative work that accompanied the 2012 World Development Report on Gender Equality and Development.

Those whose voices we hear through this report—both men and women—emphasize a central point again and again: that the ability to make effective choices and exercise control over one’s life is a critical dimension of well-being.

At the World Bank, we see this book launch as an important foundation for new directions.

The Prize & Price of a Hot Breakfast

Patti Petesch's picture

Breakfast in Peru. Samuel Bravo Silva/Flickr Creative Commons

Without a doubt my most vivid memories from my work on the new gender report On Norms and Agency: Conversations about Gender Equality with Women and Men in 20 Countries were my journeys to Peru and Liberia to pilot questions for focus groups. We conducted pilots in rural and urban areas, but as terribly different as these settings were, the level of similarities that emerged surprised me.

Namely, I imagined that traditional gender norms would be much less apparent in modern and rapidly urbanizing Lima when in fact, it was not the case. Young women in Lima described their day as getting up before sunrise in order to get a hot breakfast on the table, and then juggling a flurry of activities - including part-time work as supermarket cashiers and bank tellers. The descriptions were very similar to those we heard from women in other countries.

It was startling that gender norms in a modern city were not much different from norms in a rural community of a low-income country. Just like women from poorer and more traditional places, women in Lima helped their husbands make ends meet on top of long hours of household work. Just like in less developed communities, teenage pregnancies for girls as young as 12 and 13 were cited as a problem of deep concern. All of this in a place where girls went to high school and college, and had access to a modern family planning clinic right in their neighborhood.

Share Ideas, Post Questions: What Will It Take for Gender Empowerment?

Lauren Clyne Medley's picture

Available in French, Spanish

With International Women's Day just around the corner, World Bank Live will host an interactive chat on gender and empowerment on March 6 at 11 a.m. EST (16:00 GMT).

A specialist panel — including World Bank Vice President of Sustainable Development Rachel Kyte, World Bank Director of Gender and Development Jeni Klugman, gender experts, and field researchers from around the world — will discuss how women and men overcome the challenges posed by gender norms.

Talking to the UN Security Council about Climate Change

Rachel Kyte's picture

Flags at the United Nations. UN Photos

This morning, I had the honor of speaking to the UN Security Council about an increasingly dangerous threat facing cities and countries around the world, a threat that, more and more, is influencing everything that they and we do: climate change.

World Bank President Jim Kim is in Russia right now talking with G20 finance ministers about the same thing – the need to combat climate change. Every day, we’re hearing growing concerns from leaders around the world about climate change and its impact.

If we needed any reminder of the immediacy and the urgency of the situation, Australia Foreign Minister Bob Carr and our good friend President Tong of Kiribati spoke by video of the security implication of climate effects on the Pacific region.

Speeding Up Budget Transparency

Lauren Clyne Medley's picture

international money and receipt

Last Tuesday, the World Bank Institute, or WBI, hosted a panel discussion on speeding up budget transparency efforts and supporting inclusive development around the world. The conversation highlighted the 2012 results of the International Budget Partnership's, or IBP's, Open Budget Survey.

During the event, IBP Director Warren Krafchik and WBI Vice President Sanjay Pradhan discussed the survey's results with high-level finance ministry officials from Afghanistan, Brazil, and Liberia.

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