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Access to Information

Records from WB’s first loan to France digitized for the opening of the World Bank Visitor Center

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية
Steel mill at Montataire. © World Bank
Steel mill at Montataire. © World Bank

On November 15, 2017, the World Bank Group opened the doors to its new Visitor Center located at 1776 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. (across the street from the Bank’s Main Complex). The Visitor Center offers not only an extensive display of Bank Group’s history, but also provides an interactive learning experience about the institution’s work and mission.

To celebrate the Visitor Center’s opening and to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the World Bank’s first loan – Loan 0001 to France for reconstruction following World War II – the WBG Archives has digitized and publicly released records related to this inaugural loan. Correspondence and memoranda on the negotiation, administration, and repayment of the 1947 loan to France are now accessible on the World Bank’s Projects & Operations website along with other relevant resources and information.

Sharing the future of open access

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture


On October 26, as part of the World Bank’s celebration of the 10th International Open Access week, I moderated a panel discussion on behalf of the Bank and the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC). Experts shared their experiences, success stories, and identified remaining challenges in advancing Open Access. External participants and Bank Group staff were invited to the event, which was also live-streamed and recorded

The World Bank open access research guide

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture

This blog post is a part of the International Open Access Week blog series

Duncan Omole, Knowledge and Information Officer in ITS Knowledge and Information, explains why the World Bank Open Access Research Guide is a good starting place for researchers looking for information by and about the Bank:
 
The World Bank Group 2017 Open Access (OA) week theme is “Open in order to eradicate extreme poverty.” The World Bank Group Library supports the World Bank Group’s mission by supplying evidence-based data driven information and knowledge.
 
The World Bank’s Open Access Research Guide is one of the most important sources of this information. Why? Links to several World Bank Group Open Agenda Initiatives are found on the guide’s landing page. The World Bank’s Policy on Access to Information, the World Bank Group Finances, and Corporate Procurement Awards ($250K and above) are among the most important of these.

Demystifying appeals under the World Bank’s Access to Information policy

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
© World Bank


This blog post is a part of the International Open Access Week blog series

Today Frances M. Allen, a Communications Officer in the World Bank’s Access to Information Policy Unit, explains how the appeals process works when a request for information is denied:

The World Bank’s Policy on Access to Information (AI), effective in July 2010, was a pivotal shift in the institution’s approach to making information available to the public. Underlying the policy is the principle that Bank will disclose any information in its possession that is not on a list of exceptions.

Open in order to end extreme poverty: Access to Information as an enabling strategy

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
© World Bank

In 2009, the World Bank envisioned “open” in exactly the same way you “see” the word . . . an open door . . . and waiting behind the door . . . access to buildings and ideas, people and events.  And in the Bank’s case, access to a plethora of information on projects throughout the world, current ‘of the moment’ information on open projects, outcomes and lessons learned culled from closed projects, small grants that showed impact and improvement, research into cutting edge topics that affect everybody like climate change and displacement, and much more. 
 

Discovering the Bank’s Archives: Conversation with a researcher

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français

Giovanni Zanalda is director of the Duke University Center for International Studies/Global Areas.June 9 is International Archives Day, and I would like to mark this day by reflecting on the contribution of the World Bank Group Archives to the “memory” of the development community. As such, I am talking with Giovanni Zanalda, director of the Duke University Center for International Studies/Global Areas. Giovanni is a faculty member in the Departments of Economics and History at Duke and specializes in financial history, history of development, and emerging markets. He has been a user of the WBG Archives in different phases of his career and with different focuses, and we have asked him to share his user perspective.

Transported back in time

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
Panel members, left to right: Denis Robitaille, Slobodan Mitric, Maryvonne Plessis-Fraissard,
Christine Kessides, and Georges Bianco Darido. © Elisa Liberatori Prati/World Bank


How do you think the challenges faced by the World Bank’s urban transport teams have changed since the sector emerged in the 1970s? Did they become more or less complex? And what factors influenced the sector’s evolution? Recent research by Slobodan Mitric on the early years of the Bank’s urban transport sector gave Bank staff a unique opportunity to glimpse into the past, find some answers to these questions, and uncover the knowledge hidden in the historical records of the World Bank Group Archives.

Mitric, who has spent his entire professional life working on the subject of transport in cities and retired from the Bank in 2003 as a lead urban transport specialist, presented the findings of his research in the Archives at a panel discussion on the “World Bank’s Engagement with Transport in Cities: The Early Years 1972-1982” last month. The panel was organized by the World Bank Group Archives jointly with the History, Urban & Water, and Transportation Thematic Groups of the 1818 Society.

World Bank oral histories: Can we learn from memories?

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
Also available in: 中文



In my last post on the Bank’s Open Archives program , I wrote about how the Archives of the World Bank Group (WBG) is striving to make information easily accessible to the public, and maximizing the impact of the WBG’s open initiatives. By enabling access to the oldest and only multiregional development archives, we reveal the experience of generations of development practitioners and their counterparts to help inform the decisions of today's development community.

An information goldmine: The World Bank Group Archives goes online

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français | 中文
 Accessing the holdings of the World Bank Group archives

Until recently, archives users — including academics, development partners, and other researchers — had to travel miles, sometimes even across continents, to be able to access records kept in the World Bank Group Archives. But now, users will no longer have to be in Washington, D.C. to look at declassified materials.

In April 2015, as part of its commitment to transparency and openness, the World Bank Group launched its Archives Holdings website. This is a state-of-the-art platform, which maximizes the public’s online access to a vast amount of original primary source material in the custody of the Archives.
 
Created using the Access to Memory open source software, the website facilitates a faster, more efficient, and personalized online service delivery model. The software serves as a catalog that provides basic information about the resources of the Archives, and it is equipped with user-friendly finding aids compliant with the International Standard for Archival Description. The website delivers an increasing quantity of digitized records from the early 1940s onward, making them available for the first time to public users who cannot come to the Archives reading room in Washington, D.C.

Think you know everything about the World Bank's Open Agenda? Take the challenge!

Davinia Levy's picture

Did you know that the World Bank has a repository of more than 200,000 documents and reports at your disposal, dating all the way back to 1947? Did you also know that you can access over 18,000 development indicators, and much more?

The World Bank is celebrating the 5th anniversary of its Access to Information Policy. Since its launch in 2010, the World Bank has emerged as a global leader in the openness agenda and has disclosed a wealth of information to the public.

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