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Women’s Day in Turkey – a Working Day

Martin Raiser's picture

Having lived in many countries throughout the former Soviet Union over the last nine years, I am familiar with International Women’s Day as a holiday. In Turkey, however, Women’s Day remains a work day.

And quite appropriately so, it seems to me.

It’s Arithmetic – even in Armenia!

Souleymane Coulibaly's picture

At a time when all decision-makers around the world can think about is the state of their country’s economy, debt, spending and fiscal stability, one phrase attempts to sum it all up: it’s arithmetic.

In Armenia, it is all about arithmetic too.

Despite the volatility of Armenia’s economy in the twenty years since the country gained independence, effective government reforms led to double-digit growth rates from 2001 to 2007. That ended with the global financial crisis in 2008.

Compelling Ideas at the UN: Energy, Health, Education and #whatwillittake

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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UNITED NATIONS | It has been a week of inspiring ideas and action plans at the United Nations General Assembly in New York. I met with a number of world leaders, including Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. We talked about the importance of creating jobs for ex-combatants, the pressing need for more energy sources, and more. You can hear my thoughts on our meeting in the video below.

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Views From Brazil, Ecuador and India: What Will It Take to End Poverty?

Mehreen Arshad Sheikh's picture

Our World Bank community has been out in the field with video cameras asking families, farmers, workers and parents from all corners of the globe: What will it take… to improve your life?.. to get a better job? … to end poverty?

As part of our global conversation on social media and multimedia, we have received video from countries like Brazil, Ecuador, Tanzania, Laos and India. People are sharing their ideas, their hopes and their solutions for creating a better life for all.

Here are three views on #whatwillittake:

In Brazil, Maria José dos Santos tells us that providing more schools and childcare would allow mothers to get fulltime jobs. “It would be great if everybody had more access to child care and all day schools. That would enable mothers to work in peace.”

A Question Going Global: What Will It Take to End Poverty?

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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It’s not every day that you see a video in the back of a New York City taxicab asking people to tweet about ending global poverty. Though the most recent data tell us that global poverty has been declining, it’s shocking that some 1.3 billion people live on less than $1.25 a day.

That's half the amount of the base fare of a taxicab ride in Manhattan. It's not right.

The taxicab video, which is airing this week during the UN General Assembly, is part of a new conversation we’ve launched at the World Bank. We’re asking a simple question: What will it take to end poverty?

คำถามสำหรับคนทั้งโลก: จะทำอย่างไรเพื่อจะกำจัดความยากจนให้หมดไป

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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คงไม่ใช่ทุกวันที่คุณจะได้เห็นวีดีโอที่หลังรถแท็กซี่ในนครนิวยอร์กขอให้พวกเราทวีตเกี่ยวกับการกำจัดความยากจนทั่วโลก แม้ว่าข้อมูลล่าสุดจะระบุว่าความยากจนทั่วโลกกำลังลดลง  แต่ก็ยังเป็นที่น่าตกใจที่คนประมาณ 1,300 ล้านคนทั่วโลกยังชีพด้วยเงินน้อยกว่า 1.25 เหรียญสหรัฐต่อวัน

เงินจำนวนเท่านี้เป็นเพียงแค่ครึ่งหนึ่งของค่าโดยสารแท็กซี่ขั้นต่ำในเมืองแมนฮัตตัน ในนครนิวยอร์ค นั่นไม่ถูกต้องแล้ว

วีดีโอได้เผยแพร่บนรถแท็กซี่ระหว่างที่มีการประชุมสมัชชาสหประชาชาติในสัปดาห์นี้ และเป็นส่วนหนึ่งของบทสนทนาใหม่ที่เราได้เริ่มขึ้นที่ธนาคารโลก เรากำลังถามคำถามง่าย ๆ ว่า จะทำอย่างไรเพื่อกำจัดความยากจนให้หมดไป

Một câu hỏi cho toàn thế giới: Phải làm gì để chấm dứt đói nghèo?

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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Chẳng phải ngày nào bạn cũng nhìn thấy một đoạn video chiếu đằng sau xe taxi ở thành phố New York đề nghị mọi người viết lên Twitter về việc chấm dứt đói nghèo trên toàn cầu. Mặc dù những số liệu mới nhất cho thấy đói nghèo toàn cầu đã và đang giảm dần, nhưng thật sốc khi biết rằng khoảng 1,3 tỉ người vẫn đang sống dưới mức 1,25 đô la Mỹ/ngày.

Số tiền đó chỉ bằng một nửa tiền mở cửa xe của một chuyến taxi ở Manhattan. Điều đó thật khó chấp nhận được.

Video trên taxi đang được trình chiếu trong tuần này khi mà cuộc họp đại hội đồng Liên Hiệp Quốc đang diễn ra, là một phần của cuộc đối thoại mới mà Ngân hàng Thế giới vừa khởi động. Chúng tôi chỉ đặt một câu hỏi rất đơn giản: Phải làm gì để chấm dứt đói nghèo?

Social Media at the World Bank: Tell Us What Will It Take to End Poverty

Jim Rosenberg's picture
Also available in: العربية

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What will it take …to improve your life? …for your children to be better off?  …for mothers to be healthy? …for all to get a good education? …to end poverty? More than 1.3 billion people around the globe live on less than $1.25 a day. Fighting poverty in times of crisis may be challenging, but we can’t take our eyes off the most vulnerable.

In this video, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim asks, “What Will It Take?” Post your questions on Twitter using #whatwillittake, and share your solutions with the hashtag #ittakes.

A Great Day in South Africa for a Development Junkie

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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PRETORIA, South Africa - I have to admit it. I’m a bit of a development junkie. For most of my adult life, I’ve been reading thick tomes describing the success or failure of projects. I talk to friends over dinner about development theory. And I can’t stop thinking about what I believe is the biggest development question of all: How do we most effectively deliver on our promises to the poor?

So you can imagine how excited I was to have a day full of meetings with South Africa’s foremost experts on development: the country's ministers of finance, economic development, health, basic education, water and environmental affairs, and rural development and land reform - and then with President Jacob Zuma.

I chose to travel to South Africa as part of my first overseas trip as president of the World Bank Group because of the country’s great importance to the region, continent, and the world. It is the economic engine of Africa, and its story of reconciliation after apartheid is one of the historic achievements of our time.

Putting Nature at the Heart of Economic Decisions

Rachel Kyte's picture

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To put nature at the heart of economic decisions, government, the private sector & the conservation community must reach across the aisle.

Look around the world, and you’ll see abundant reasons to worry about nature and its capacity to sustain us. Over 60 percent of ecosystems are in worse shape now than 50 years ago; 85 percent of ocean fisheries are fully exploited, over-exploited or depleted; half of all wetlands have been destroyed since 1900; and climate change is changing everything.

But at the same time, if you look carefully, there are reasons for cautious optimism.

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