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Youth Skills, Employability and Creating an “Innovation Culture”

Anush Bezhanyan's picture

Across the globe, young people are a growing share of the labor force. Goals about poverty reduction and shared prosperity depend on the jobs and earnings opportunities they will have.  The technical, cognitive, and behavioral skills (such us teamwork, problem-solving skills and creativity) of workers will determine, to a large extent, their job and earnings opportunities. Unfortunately, around the world, much of the labor force has very low levels of education. Young people graduating from vocational centers or universities often lack the relevant skills for the labor markets.

At this year’s Solutions4Work conference, more than 170 academics, business leaders, and government ministers gathered together in Istanbul, Turkey to discuss challenges and solutions facing countries in addressing youth employment. At the conference, we are particularly energized to hear from youth groups and entrepreneurs from around the world who are creating a movement, change in culture, and tools for their fellow youth.

We heard from Neda’a Kharoub whose organization Trip to Innovation aims to create an “innovation culture” and social entrepreneurship among Jordanian youth and entrepreneurs. Lina Maria Useche Jarmillo through her foundation Alianca Empreendedora in Brazil seeks to transform job seekers to young entrepreneurs. May Habib, founder of Qordoba, employs a web-based business model in matching youth skills with clients.  Imge Kaya Sabanci who leads Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Women initiative in Turkey provides business and entrepreneurship education to women and is now reporting promising results. We asked them why they think youth unemployment is a pressing issue and how best to address it. Here’s what they have to say:
 

Youth Skills, Employability and Creating an “Innovation Culture”

This post is part of a series appearing from the Solutions4Work Conference – held in Istanbul, Turkey.

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