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Learning from Megadisasters

Abha Joshi-Ghani's picture
We recently launched our new World Bank Group publication “Learning from Megadisasters” which captures the lessons from the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE). We were reminded of the destruction caused by the earthquake, which measured a staggering 9.0 on the Richter scale, and the ensuing Tsunami.  It is hard to forget the images of toppling sea walls and how entire towns and villages were submerged or washed away.  Images of devastation, that left some 20,000 people dead or missing.

2014 Annual Meetings Guide to Webcast Events

Donna Barne's picture

How can economic growth benefit more people? What will it take to double the share of renewables in the global energy mix? Will the world have enough food for everyone by 2050? You can hear what experts have to say on these topics and others, ask questions, and weigh in at more than 20 webcast events from Oct. 7 to 11. That's when thousands of development leaders gather in Washington for the World Bank-International Monetary Fund Annual Meetings. Several events will be live-blogged or live-tweeted in multiple languages. You can also follow the conversation on Twitter with #wblive and other hashtags connected to events. We’ve compiled a sampling of events and hashtags below.  Check out the full schedule or download the Annual Meetings app for Apple devices and Android smartphones.

Beyond the allure of the Serengeti: What can nature-based tourism do for development?

Paula Caballero's picture
Ruaha is home to 10 percent of the world’s shrinking lion population

Think Tanzania and you may imagine yourself in the plains of the Serengeti or the peaks of Mount Kilimanjaro. This week I was in Ruaha National Park, the second largest national park in all of Africa, but merely a blip on the tourist map. It is not just geographically large but ecologically rich and mega diverse – it has more than 1,400 species of plants and is home to abundant iconic wildlife species. Compare the tourism traffic:  while Serengeti has 300,000 visitors annually, Ruaha has only 20,000 per year. Despite its share of nature’s bounty, Ruaha symbolizes a missed opportunity to be an engine of growth for Tanzania. By building an effective sustainable tourism policy, this reality could change fairly quickly.
 

Indigenous Peoples and poverty: A second chance to get it right

Harry A. Patrinos's picture
 Curt Carnemark/World Bank
Guatemalan women in traditional dress. Photo: Curt Carnemark/World Bank

This week, over a thousand indigenous delegates descended in New York City for the first World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, a high-level plenary meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, to share perspectives and best practices on the realization of the rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Indigenous Peoples represent 4 percent of the world’s population yet account for over 10 percent of the world’s poor. In a book I co-authored, Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and Development we argue that the development community cannot afford to ignore Indigenous Peoples if it aims to achieve the international development goals, both the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the soon to be announced Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and post-2015 goals.

Better Understanding Disaster Risk: A New Dataset Is Set to Make a Difference

Alanna Simpson's picture
 USGS
These maps of the Niger Delta show the increased detail through higher-resolution datasets newly released by the U.S. Geological Survey. Credit: USGS

​​Imagine you are a city official who wants to ensure all future infrastructure and urban development in your city is climate- and disaster-sensitive. The first step is to understand the natural hazards of today and tomorrow—flood, storm surge, sea level rise, etc.—and how they could impact your city. Thanks to higher-resolution geospatial datasets released this week by the U.S. Government, you will now be able to have a better understanding of the risks your city faces and how to manage them. 


These newly available Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) were developed by the U.S. Government and detail the surface of the earth in 3D. By illustrating the geography and topography of an area, they enable users to quantify the potential destructive impact of water-related hazards. As a city official, you will be able to base your analyses on 3D maps showing the natural terrain and elevation of your city, which determine the path of the water. 

Во транзицијата од училиште кон вработување, дали можеме да поттикнеме начин на размислување и определба за раст за да им помогнеме на младите да успеет?

World Bank Mindset Team's picture
Also available in: English


Како најдобро да им помогнеме на децата и младите да успеат во животот?
Ова прашање има највисок приоритет за родителите, едукаторите и креаторите на политики низ целиот свет. Сè поголемо внимание се посветува на клучната улога на социоемоционалните вештини како што се определбата (упорноста) и мотивацијата да се надминат пречките и неуспесите во патот кон успехот. Најновите проминентни примери во фокусот на оваа тема се блогот на Салман Кан (од онлајн академијата на Салман Кан) во Хафингтон пост на оваа тема [1], и неодамнешниот пост во Линкдин на претседателот на Групацијата Светска банка Џим Јонг Ким [2].

Delivering on Climate Smart Agriculture

Juergen Voegele's picture


Delivering food and nutrition security in the face of climate change is one of the biggest challenges of our generation. So it’s encouraging to see influential stakeholders around the world taking action today at the Climate Summit.  From the private sector’s efforts to put a price on carbon, to the energy sector’s focus on lowering emissions, key stakeholders are realizing that inaction is not an option.

But one sector has yet to get its act together. Climate action may be gaining momentum, but the agriculture sector is largely stuck in ‘business as usual’ mode.  Unlike other areas of the economy, it hasn’t made any big, transformational moves towards climate resilience or reducing emissions.  We are missing our “electric car”. 

Why CEOs Care About Climate Change

Jim Yong Kim's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Español
Photo: © Dana Smillie / World Bank
Photo: © Dana Smillie / World Bank

I’ve been hearing from business leaders over the past few months about the impact climate change could have on their industries and the goods and services we all rely on. They might not talk much about it publicly, but they are very aware of the risks a warming planet poses for their supply chains, factories and work force.

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