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Crowding in Technical and Financial Resources in Support of Forest Landscapes

Paula Caballero's picture
Mexico butterflies by Curt Carnemark / World Bank ​As financing for development talks wrapped up last week in Addis, many conversations revolved around the “how much” as well as on the “how” of achieving universal sustainable and inclusive development in the post 2015 context. Work in the natural resources arena has valuable lessons to offer. 

There is a growing consensus that a new approach is needed to meet the financial needs of developing countries to ensure sustainable, inclusive and resilient growth paths. We all know that Official Development Assistance (ODA) finance is limited and cannot address the massive investment needs of countries. In addition to increased domestic resource mobilization, the more effective engagement of a variety of players, especially from private sector, NGOs, and philanthropic organizations, will be key to close the finance gap. 

A slogan for sustainable agriculture: 'Mot Phai, Nam Giam' rice production

Chris Jackson's picture
Also available in: Tiếng Việt
A woman measures greenhouse gas emissions on a rice farm in Vietnam.
A woman measures greenhouse gas emissions on a rice farm in Vietnam.


Successful slogans can make a world of difference. In Vietnam, a catchphrase for a climate-smart way to produce rice has shown small farmers how they can boost rice profitability, while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The World Bank discovered this through an Agriculture Competitiveness Project in Vietnam, which championed an alternate wetting and drying rice production technique that uses less water, reduction in application of fertilizers and management of crop residues to reduce the level of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from the rice fields. Adopting this climate-smart practice required the systematic engagement of the entire community committed to draining the rice fields multiple times over a matter of weeks, something traditionally rarely done. Adopting this alternate wetting and drying technique not only helps strengthen plant roots but also reduces flooding periods which translates into reduced methane production.

“Một phải, năm giảm” – khẩu hiệu sản xuất nông nghiệp bền vững

Chris Jackson's picture
Also available in: English
A woman measures greenhouse gas emissions on a rice farm in Vietnam.
Đo mức phát thải khí nhà kính tại Việt Nam.


Khẩu hiệu đúng có thể làm thay đổi nhiều thứ. Ở Việt Nam, câu khẩu hiệu về phương thức canh tác lúa gạo ứng phó thông minh với biến đổi khí hậu đã giúp nông dân nâng cao lợi nhuận từ sản xuất lúa gạo và giảm phát thải khí nhà kính.

Ngân hàng Thế giới đã phát hiện ra việc này thông qua dự án Cạnh tranh nông nghiệp (ACP) ở Việt Nam, ở đó dự án đã ứng dụng thành công kỹ thuật trồng lúa với các giai đoạn ngập- khô xen kẽ. Kỹ thuật canh tác này dự trên nguyên tắc sử dụng ít nước tưới, giảm lượng phân bón, và quản lý tốt hơn các phế phẩm từ sản xuất lúa để làm giảm mức phát thải khí mê-tan và ô-xit ni-tơ từ các cánh đồng lúa. Để áp dụng được công nghệ này cần phải huy động được sự tham gia của toàn bộ cộng đồng một cách có hệ thống qua đó có thể rút được nước từ ruộng và để khô nhiều lần trong một vài tuần. Đây là điều mà ít được làm trước đây trong cách canh tác lúa truyền thống. Việc áp dụng kỹ thuật canh tác lúa ngập- khô xen kẽ không chỉ giúp rễ cây lúa phát triển tốt hơn mà còn giúp làm giảm thời gian ngập nước trong ruộng qua đó giảm được lượng phát thải khí mê-tan.

Economic growth and climate action – a formula for a low carbon world

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية | 中文

© Shynar Jetpissova/World Bank

Most people now realize the cost of inaction to deal with climate change is far higher than the cost of action. The challenge is mustering the political will to make smart policy choices.

A new report by the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, of which I am a member, shows climate action delivers local development benefits as well as emissions reductions. In fact, smart policy choices can deliver economic, health and climate benefits for developed and developing countries alike.

Ending poverty and boosting shared prosperity is about realizing human potential

Ted Chu's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Español | Français
© Vikash Kumar

I have been fascinated by the concept of frontier all my life. What brought us here? What’s next? As a kid, my favorite book was “Ten Thousand Whys,” a pop-science series with all kinds of seemingly trivial questions like “Why are there fewer stars in the sky in winter?”

I wrote my Ph.D. dissertation on the Production Efficiency Frontier Theory — how to identify the most efficient units in a production network and measure the technical frontier. Later I became more of a macroeconomist and my interest expanded to identifying countries standing on the growth frontier. Subsequently, I began studying the deepest thinkers and became convinced that humanity is on an important new frontier of cosmic evolution.

#Music4Dev guest artist Nneka’s advice for women: ‘Don’t let anyone intimidate you’

Korina Lopez's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español

UPDATE: To continue shedding the light on women's rights, Nneka shared another song with us, Shining Star, at World Bank Group's headquarters in Washington D.C.

Ever since Nigerian singer Nneka released her debut album, Victim of Truth, in 2005, the diminutive star has been one of the most vocal advocates of anti-corruption and women’s rights in Africa. She continues beating that drum to raise awareness of her fourth album, My Fairy Tales, this time exploring the struggles of Africans in the diaspora. She recently stopped by World Bank’s headquarters to share her music and voice her views on women’s rights. “I use my music as a platform to (give voice) to such issues,” she says. “I grew up in Nigeria where women don’t have much freedom on many different levels. I was raised in a system where you respect the system through fear.

Who sets the rules of the game in Asia?

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture
© Nonie Reyes/World Bank


It is now a commonplace to refer to the 21st century as the Asian Century. With the world economy struggling to recover from the global financial crisis, the Asia Pacific region, and especially its developing countries, has provided much of the impetus for global growth. In 2015, developing countries in the East Asia Pacific region are likely to account for over one-third of global growth — twice as much as the rest of the developing world. China in particular is now an economic powerhouse. By some measures China is now the world’s largest economy as well as the biggest global manufacturer and exporter.

With this economic success has come increased scrutiny of the region. The rest of the world now wants to know: who sets the rules of the game in Asia?

Say “yes” to evaluation, then communicate findings clearly

Rachel Coleman's picture
Experts who measure the effectiveness of women’s economic empowerment programs recently gathered at the Center for Global Development (CGD) to take on a number of questions—from how to design monitoring and evaluation frameworks to how to translate their findings into accessible lessons learned.
 
CGD Conference Panelists

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