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'Fish Queens' in Africa

Jingjie Chu's picture
A woman cleans a fish while carrying her child on her back in Ghana. © Andrea Borgarello/World Bank
​​Intriguing, I thought when I first heard the phrase. In Ghana’s small-scale fisheries, the 'Fish Mommy' or 'Fish Queen' is the matriarch of the fish landings. She also doubles as the local authority on all post-harvest operations, exercising a great deal of control over the local market by setting the prevailing price of that day’s fresh catch every morning on the docks of coastal communities in Ghana.

Actions speak louder than words: Opportunities abound for forests in combating climate change

Ellysar Baroudy's picture
Franka Braun/World Bank


Over the past several weeks, we have made headway in our efforts to reduce deforestation and promote sustainable land use as part of a broader World Bank Group approach to combat climate change. Partnering with the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), the Democratic Republic of Congo has taken a major step by assessing its readiness for a large-scale initiative in which developing forested countries keep their forests standing and developed countries pay for the carbon that is not released into the atmosphere. Likewise, other countries in the 47-country FCPF partnership are making strides in their efforts to prepare for programs that mitigate greenhouse gas emission and support sustainable forest landscapes.

This approach is also known as REDD+, or reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. Active REDD+ programs can help reduce the 20 percent of carbon emissions that come from forest loss and simultaneously provide support to the 60 million people, including indigenous communities, who are wholly dependent on forests.

Burundi reinforces conservation for resilience amid political tensions

Paola Agostini's picture
Photo by IRRI via Creative CommonsFor those keeping abreast of Burundi’s state of affairs, it could be easy to forget that the country is much more inviting than what we have seen lately in the media. Despite the ongoing crisis, Burundians have kept an uphill battle to reinforce the conservation and management of the nation’s forest areas

Show What You Know. Take the A to Z quiz.

Jewel McFadden's picture
The World Bank Group A to Z coverWelcome to round 3 of the Which World Banker Are You? quiz. To be an expert World Banker this week, you have to know about the goals and comprising institutions of the world’s largest anti-poverty organization. Answer five questions to work your way up the ranks as an aspiring, newbie, seasoned, or expert World Banker. Each week look for a new quiz to show what you know.

State of global development: Why 2015 is a pivotal year for ending poverty

Jim Yong Kim's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français
© Arne Hoel/World Bank


In this series, professionals debate the state – and future – of their industry. Read all the posts here and write your own (use #MyIndustry in the body of your post).

I work in one of the most rewarding fields imaginable – helping low- and middle-income countries develop so that poor people have a fair chance at reaching their full potential. My field of work is at a critical crossroads, and it is no exaggeration that the decisions we make this year will have an impact on everyone in the world and especially the poorest.

How forensic intelligence helps combat illegal wildlife trade

Samuel Wasser's picture
Also available in: Español | العربية
 Diana Robinson / Creative Commons Over the past decade, illegal poaching of wildlife has quickly caught up to habitat destruction as a leading cause of wildlife loss in many countries.
 
Poaching African elephants for ivory provides a case in point. Elephant poaching has sharply increased since 2006. We may now be losing up to 50,000 elephants per year with only 450,000 elephants remaining in Africa.  In short, we are running out of time and unless we can stop the killing, we will surely lose the battle. Decreasing demand for ivory is vital over the long term, but the scale of current elephant losses makes this strategy too slow to save elephants by itself. The ecological, economic and security consequences from the loss of this keystone species will be quite severe and potentially irreversible. 

#KidsEndPoverty: Чи юу хийж чадах вэ, хүүхдүүд та нар туслахын тулд яах вэ?

Korina Lopez's picture
Also available in: English | Français | Español | العربية | 中文

Өнөөдөр зургадугаар сарын 1. Дэлхийн олон оронд Хүүхдийн эрхийг хамгаалах өдрийг тэмдэглэж байна. Бид хүүхдүүддээ ямар дэлхийг өвлүүлэн үлдээж байна вэ гэдгийг эргэцүүлэн бодох боломж олгож байна. Хүүхдүүдээ өсч том болохоос өмнө ядуурлаас ангижирсан дэлхийг тэдэндээ үлдээхийн төлөө хамтдаа нэгдэцгээе. Өнөөгийн бүх хүүхдийн сайн сайхан ирээдүйн төлөө бид хамтдаа 2030 он гэхэд ядуурлыг ялж чадна. Энэ блогт бичигдсэн зүйлийг өөрийн орчин тойронд амьдарч байгаа хүүхдүүдтэй хуваалцаарай. Мөн тэдний урлагийн бүтээлийг ирүүлээрэй, тэдгээр бүтээлийг бид Дэлхийн банкны нийгмийн сүлжээгээр түгээх юм.

Маяа гэдэг охин байна гээд төсөөл дөө. Маяа охин ядуу оронд амьдардаг, аав ээж өдөржин ажилладаг, тэр сургуульд явж чадахгүй, яагаад гэвэл дүүгээ асрах хэрэгтэй. Аав ээж нь хичнээн хичээж махруу ажиллаад ч гэр бүлээ тэжээхэд хүрэлцэх, мөн Маяагийн сургуульд сурахад шаардлагатай мөнгийг олж чадахгүй. Маяа болон Маяагийн гэр бүл маш зайдуу амьдардаг, хэн нэг нь Маяагийн дүүг асарч Маяа сургуульд явах боломжтой боллоо гэхэд сургууль хүртэл явах автобусны зам ч тэнд байхгүй. Боловсрол гэдэг бол уншиж, бичиж, нэмж, хасаж сурна гэсэн үг. Өсч том болсоныхоо дараа ажил олж хийхийн тулд хүүхдүүд эдгээр зүйлсийг сурсан байх шаардлагатай. Боловсролгүй байна гэдэг бол ажиллаж, хөдөлмөрлөх боломж бараг байхгүй гэсэн үг. Ядуу учраас Маяа чам шиг сургуульд сурч чадахгүй байна гэдэг шударга гэж үү. Бүх хүүхэд сургуульд сурч, өвдсөн үедээ эмчид үзүүлж, идэх хоолтой, эцэг эхтэйгээ хамт амьдардаг гэр оронтой, тэндээ унтдаг байх учиртай. Харамсалтай нь Маяатай ижил олон хүүхэд бий. Бид тэдэнд хэрхэн тусалж чадах вэ? Түүнд туслахын тулд чи юу хийж чадах вэ??

Keeping fish on the global menu

Paula Caballero's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español
Fish is source of protein for 1 billion people​​I’m pleased to see fish so high on the agenda this week. Whether in Brussels, where European Fisheries Development Advisors Network (EFDAN) held technical meetings, or in Cascais, Portugal, where The Economist hosts its third World Ocean Summit today and tomorrow, the future of marine fisheries and aquatic resources is being discussed at the levels it deserves.
 
But let me make something clear on behalf of the World Bank: The focus on fisheries is a focus on creating pathways out of poverty that will keep people out of poverty and enable dignified lives. About 1 billion people in developing countries rely on seafood as a primary source of animal protein, and millions of jobs are linked to fisheries. Along the value chain, many of the jobs are held by women. The ocean is also a major sink for greenhouse gases and the fate of growing coastal populations is tied to the state of natural coastline defenses against extreme weather events. The emerging concept of blue economy and blue growth rests at the heart of our main development challenges: feeding, providing jobs to and generally improving the lives of a growing population in a changing climate.

In Ethiopia, a safety net program helps improve gender roles

Maniza Naqvi's picture

Abebech, a single mother of three, in Arsi Negelle district in Ethiopia heads out for another shift at the construction site for gully embankments, part of a public works program offered by the Government of Ethiopia to address food insecurity.
 
Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP) reaches an estimated 9 million people across the regions of Amhara, Oromiya, Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples Region, Tigray, Afar, Somali, Dire Dawa, and Harar.  Food or cash payments are provided to very poor households. Payments are made in return for community work known as ‘public works’ – with participants working on soil and water conservation, construction of schools, health posts, childcare centers and road building. The work is scheduled usually after harvest season to ensure food security and enough money to carry through seasonal food shortages.
 
Poor households in Ethiopia face a series of economic, social and environmental risks and vulnerabilities with risks often higher for women. While women help with farming and related work, they also receive unequal access to resources, financing, training, and are also more vulnerable to household-related shocks -- illness, death of household member, drought, flood, price shocks, job loss, loss or death of livestock.  Women in rural areas typically received poor education and are paid lower for the same type of work as their male counterparts.

#KidsEndPoverty: What can you — and your kids — do to help?

Korina Lopez's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | العربية | 中文 | Mongolian

Today, June 1, many countries around the world mark Children’s Day, offering an opportunity to reflect on the kind of world our kids will inherit. Let’s join together to make a better worldone free from extreme povertybefore they grow up. Together we can end poverty by 2030 and ensure a better world for today’s kids and all children in the future. Share this blog post with your kids, or children from your community, and submit their artwork to be considered for World Bank social media channels. 

​​Imagine a girl named Maya. Maya lives in a poor country where her parents work all day, and she can’t go to school because she has to care for her baby brother. Even though her parents work very hard, they barely make enough to feed the family, much less buy school supplies for Maya. She and her family live out in the country, and there are no roads for buses to take Maya to school, even if there was someone to care for her brother while her parents work. Education means learning to read, write, add, and subtract. Kids need to learn all these things to find jobs when they grow up. No education means very little access to jobs. Is it fair that just because Maya is poor that she can’t go to school, just like you?

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