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Music star Fally Ipupa: First and foremost, a son of Africa

Liviane Urquiza's picture
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Although Fally Ipupa has found success as a music star in Africa, he hasn't turned his back on development problems. Instead, he remains firmly rooted in the reality of the continent and wants to restore its joy. By joining the World Bank’s #Music4Dev initiative, Fally Ipupa is reaffirming his wish for his continent, Africa: to benefit from his success.

It's not the first time that the entertainer is using his popularity to raise the awareness of his followers to Africa’s challenges. Thousands of fans around the world are well aware that Fally Ipupa is an entertainer who is committed to combatting poverty and inequality.  While he is most active in his own country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, he recently started developing projects in Côte d’Ivoire and intends to expand his work.  To carry out these projects, he created the FIF foundation with the mission of restoring joy to the most vulnerable Africans.  How will he do this? By providing them with access to the resources they need most — water, schools, and medical care — and shielding them from the sources of hardship — conflicts, adverse weather conditions, and diseases.

While performing a series of concerts in the United States (in particular Global Citizen Earth Day 2015 in Washington, where he appeared with No Doubt, Usher, D’Banj and many others), Fally Ipupa visited the World Bank’s headquarters.  We invited him to join our #Music4Dev initiative, which brings together global musicians around a common goal of disseminating the following message:

Our generation can end extreme poverty by 2030 if we act together now.

Fally Ipupa has accepted our invitation! We will let you follow developments in the video-recorded interview.
 

#Music4Dev with Fally Ipupa
 
End Poverty.


Not so long ago the notion seemed impossible, even ridiculous. In 1990, 36% of world's population lived on $1.25 a day. As of 2010, that number has dropped to 16%. By 2030, we aim to reach 3% and that goal is in our sights.

Action begins with awareness. If people don’t know that change is needed, then change will never happen. To that end we've created a new series to raise awareness about poverty, #Music4Dev, where we welcome artists from around the globe to share their music using the World Bank as, literally, their stage.

By sharing their music, these global artists are spreading the word about ending poverty, and inspiring fans to take action. We’ll link to the #Music4Dev performances from this page. The videos will also be available on the World Bank’s YouTube channel. Look for more information about #Music4Dev on SoundcloudFacebookTwitter and Instagram.  

Check out our other #Music4Dev guest artists:

Comments

Submitted by Christian Lukusa on

Thank Liviane for this information. This is Christian , a Lawyer from DRC

Submitted by christian parusse on

I would like to thank you Liviane for this news,
And thank also Fally Ipupa for his commitment.
From the last and today we are ranked 14th economy in africa ahead of ivory cost, zambia,namibia, and botswana.
Thanks so lot mr the president of the republic JOSEPH KABILA.

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