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India’s Informal Workers Form a ‘People’s Economy’

Renana Jhabvala's picture

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In recent years, we’ve seen sweeping change across the world’s economies; formal systems have broken down and become informal. My home region of South Asia is no exception: more than 90 percent of the workforce is made up of informal workers—street vendors, home-based workers, construction workers and smallholder farmers, many of whom aren’t certain of their incomes from week to week.

Longreads: Women and Political Power, Developing Countries Turn to Each Other for Conservation, Skills Are the Test of Progress

Donna Barne's picture

Find a good longread on development? Tweet it to @worldbank with the hashtag #longreads.

The new Global Gender Gap Report by the World Economic Forum inspired tweets and stories all over the world, including this one in Bloomberg Businessweek highlighting the finding that women represent only 20% of elected officials.  Also check out the gender inequality data visualization in Slate.  Biodiversity and ecosystems popped up on Twitter during the UN biodiversity meeting in Hyderabad, India, in October. While developed countries doubled pledges for conservation, India also made headlines when it announced a $50 million grant to help developing countries preserve biodiversity. The move, along with other examples of recent conservation efforts by emerging countries, hints of a future in which larger developing economies “play a more active role in saving the environment – not just at home, but also abroad,” reports the New York Times blog, India Ink.  With global youth unemployment at critical levels, a new Education for All Global Monitoring Report finds that 20% of young people in developing countries don’t have enough education or skills for work.  Kwame Akyeampong, an Education for All senior policy analyst, looks at the situation for themost vulnerable and disadvantaged youth in his native Ghana in an Al Jazeera opinion piece.  Once available only to paid subscribers, academic research papers are now increasingly accessible through open access publishing, according to a story in The Guardian. “The exponential rise in open access publishing shows no sign of slowing down,” writes Stephen Curry, a professor of structural biology at Imperial College. 

Russia: a Study in Numbers

Kaspar Richter's picture

Is Russia’s economy just about to shift a gear downwards?

In the decade before the global financial crisis, Russia’s growth averaged 7 percent, thanks to rising oil prices, rapid credit expansion and policy reform. Then, after the economy took a nosedive in 2009, Russia rebounded to growth above 4 percent even though the global economy was sluggish and the euro area soon went back into a recession.

But now, as we begin the final three months of 2012, Russia’s economy is settling onto a lower growth trajectory. In our new Russian Economic Report, we project that Russia will grow only 3.5 percent this year. Excluding the crisis years of 1998 and 2009, this would be the lowest rate in a decade and a half.

Views From Brazil, Ecuador and India: What Will It Take to End Poverty?

Mehreen Arshad Sheikh's picture

Our World Bank community has been out in the field with video cameras asking families, farmers, workers and parents from all corners of the globe: What will it take… to improve your life?.. to get a better job? … to end poverty?

As part of our global conversation on social media and multimedia, we have received video from countries like Brazil, Ecuador, Tanzania, Laos and India. People are sharing their ideas, their hopes and their solutions for creating a better life for all.

Here are three views on #whatwillittake:

In Brazil, Maria José dos Santos tells us that providing more schools and childcare would allow mothers to get fulltime jobs. “It would be great if everybody had more access to child care and all day schools. That would enable mothers to work in peace.”

A Question Going Global: What Will It Take to End Poverty?

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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It’s not every day that you see a video in the back of a New York City taxicab asking people to tweet about ending global poverty. Though the most recent data tell us that global poverty has been declining, it’s shocking that some 1.3 billion people live on less than $1.25 a day.

That's half the amount of the base fare of a taxicab ride in Manhattan. It's not right.

The taxicab video, which is airing this week during the UN General Assembly, is part of a new conversation we’ve launched at the World Bank. We’re asking a simple question: What will it take to end poverty?

คำถามสำหรับคนทั้งโลก: จะทำอย่างไรเพื่อจะกำจัดความยากจนให้หมดไป

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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คงไม่ใช่ทุกวันที่คุณจะได้เห็นวีดีโอที่หลังรถแท็กซี่ในนครนิวยอร์กขอให้พวกเราทวีตเกี่ยวกับการกำจัดความยากจนทั่วโลก แม้ว่าข้อมูลล่าสุดจะระบุว่าความยากจนทั่วโลกกำลังลดลง  แต่ก็ยังเป็นที่น่าตกใจที่คนประมาณ 1,300 ล้านคนทั่วโลกยังชีพด้วยเงินน้อยกว่า 1.25 เหรียญสหรัฐต่อวัน

เงินจำนวนเท่านี้เป็นเพียงแค่ครึ่งหนึ่งของค่าโดยสารแท็กซี่ขั้นต่ำในเมืองแมนฮัตตัน ในนครนิวยอร์ค นั่นไม่ถูกต้องแล้ว

วีดีโอได้เผยแพร่บนรถแท็กซี่ระหว่างที่มีการประชุมสมัชชาสหประชาชาติในสัปดาห์นี้ และเป็นส่วนหนึ่งของบทสนทนาใหม่ที่เราได้เริ่มขึ้นที่ธนาคารโลก เรากำลังถามคำถามง่าย ๆ ว่า จะทำอย่างไรเพื่อกำจัดความยากจนให้หมดไป

Một câu hỏi cho toàn thế giới: Phải làm gì để chấm dứt đói nghèo?

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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Chẳng phải ngày nào bạn cũng nhìn thấy một đoạn video chiếu đằng sau xe taxi ở thành phố New York đề nghị mọi người viết lên Twitter về việc chấm dứt đói nghèo trên toàn cầu. Mặc dù những số liệu mới nhất cho thấy đói nghèo toàn cầu đã và đang giảm dần, nhưng thật sốc khi biết rằng khoảng 1,3 tỉ người vẫn đang sống dưới mức 1,25 đô la Mỹ/ngày.

Số tiền đó chỉ bằng một nửa tiền mở cửa xe của một chuyến taxi ở Manhattan. Điều đó thật khó chấp nhận được.

Video trên taxi đang được trình chiếu trong tuần này khi mà cuộc họp đại hội đồng Liên Hiệp Quốc đang diễn ra, là một phần của cuộc đối thoại mới mà Ngân hàng Thế giới vừa khởi động. Chúng tôi chỉ đặt một câu hỏi rất đơn giản: Phải làm gì để chấm dứt đói nghèo?

Social Media at the World Bank: Tell Us What Will It Take to End Poverty

Jim Rosenberg's picture
Also available in: العربية

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What will it take …to improve your life? …for your children to be better off?  …for mothers to be healthy? …for all to get a good education? …to end poverty? More than 1.3 billion people around the globe live on less than $1.25 a day. Fighting poverty in times of crisis may be challenging, but we can’t take our eyes off the most vulnerable.

In this video, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim asks, “What Will It Take?” Post your questions on Twitter using #whatwillittake, and share your solutions with the hashtag #ittakes.

Can you teach an aging brain new skills?

Cristian Aedo's picture

Today, employers all over the world report difficulties in finding workers with adequate skills. While much of the focus is on young labor market entrants not acquiring the right set of skills, governments also face the challenge of retooling the skills of their current workforce to reflect a changing economic environment and labor market.

A Great Day in South Africa for a Development Junkie

Jim Yong Kim's picture

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PRETORIA, South Africa - I have to admit it. I’m a bit of a development junkie. For most of my adult life, I’ve been reading thick tomes describing the success or failure of projects. I talk to friends over dinner about development theory. And I can’t stop thinking about what I believe is the biggest development question of all: How do we most effectively deliver on our promises to the poor?

So you can imagine how excited I was to have a day full of meetings with South Africa’s foremost experts on development: the country's ministers of finance, economic development, health, basic education, water and environmental affairs, and rural development and land reform - and then with President Jacob Zuma.

I chose to travel to South Africa as part of my first overseas trip as president of the World Bank Group because of the country’s great importance to the region, continent, and the world. It is the economic engine of Africa, and its story of reconciliation after apartheid is one of the historic achievements of our time.

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