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stunting

Disrupting poverty and stunting: An alternative development model in rural India

Alok K. Singh's picture
© World Bank

Sustained long-term development interventions combined with disruptive technologies can make a real difference in solving entrenched multi-faceted poverty challenges. For over twenty years, I have been solving technology challenges within the World Bank Group. During this time, I have also seen the World Bank Group solve development challenges across the world. In my spare time, I have used all this knowledge to solve problems in my village. I have recently been asked to share my experiences in this blog and seven-minute presentation

In the poorest countries, an acute climate risk

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture
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A man walks through a flooded rice field. © Nonie Reyes/World Bank

For the first time in history, the number of people living in extreme poverty has fallen below 10%. The world has never been as ambitious about development as it is today. After adopting the Sustainable Development Goals and signing the Paris climate deal at the end of 2015, the global community is now looking into the best and most effective ways of reaching these milestones. In this five-part series I will discuss what the World Bank Group is doing and what we are planning to do in key areas that are critical for ending poverty by 2030: good governancegender equality, conflict and fragility, preventing and adapting to climate change, and, finally, creating jobs.

Seawater is rising in coastal Bangladesh. The soil contains more and more salt as the sea encroaches on the land. As a result, farmers see their crops declining. Communities are hollowing out, as working-age adults move to cities. Freshwater fish are disappearing, reducing the amount of protein in local diets. And in the dry season, mothers have to ration drinking water for their children – in some areas, to as little as two glasses a day.
 
Climate change is finally being taken seriously in the developed world, but it is generally seen as a future threat, to be managed over the coming years.  For poor people in poor countries, particularly those living along coastlines, in river deltas, or on islands, it is a clear and present danger – and increasingly, a dominant fact of life.