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Terrorism

How we’re fighting conflict and fragility where poverty is deepest

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español

View from cave, Mali. © Curt Carnemark/World Bank

For the first time in history, the number of people living in extreme poverty has fallen below 10%. The world has never been as ambitious about development as it is today. After adopting the Sustainable Development Goals and signing the Paris climate deal at the end of 2015, the global community is now looking into the best and most effective ways of reaching these milestones. In this five-part series I will discuss what the World Bank Group is doing and what we are planning to do in key areas that are critical for ending poverty by 2030:
good governance, gender equality, conflict and fragility, creating jobs, and, finally, preventing and adapting to climate change.
 
By 2030, more than half of the world’s poorest people will live in very poor countries that are fragile, affected by conflict, or experience high levels of violence
 
These are places where governments cannot adequately provide even basic services and security, where economic activity is paralyzed and where development is the most difficult.  It is also where poverty is deepest. The problems these countries face don’t respect borders. About half of the world’s 20 million refugees are from poor countries. Many more are displaced within their own country.

Combatting the financing of terrorism: time for results

Jean Pesme's picture

Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, France, Mali, Nigeria. Tunisia. To go back further in time – Kenya, Somalia, Tunisia, Cameroon. In no way a comprehensive list.

Paris is my home. I have also visited many countries affected by terrorist acts. Global terrorism hits home for me, and affects so many friends and colleagues. I mourn all these casualties, all this shocking horror.

They also hit home because my work over the last 15 years has focused on combatting the financing of terrorism (CFT). I have been wondering a lot over the last months – is the counter terrorism financing community delivering?