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Labor and Social Protection

More Work Needed to Make Labor Migration a Safer Option for Youth

Michael Boampong's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français

Roughly 27 million young people leave their country of birth to find employment abroad. Does this trend suggest that migration may be a solution to the worrying situation whereby 60% of young people in developing regions that are either unemployed, not studying, or engaged in irregular employment?

To End Poverty, We Need to Know What We Don't Know About Women and Girls

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture
A schoolgirl in Guatemala. © Maria Fleischmann/World Bank


Women make up almost half the world's labor force and perform most of its unpaid care work, for children, the elderly, and the disabled. They also earn less and own less than men — especially land and housing. And they face enormous constraints in the world of work — from laws that prevent them from opening bank accounts to social norms that push them into lower-paying, less secure jobs.

As a result women are more vulnerable to poverty than men.

On disability: we all have some skills, we all lack some others –and we all can contribute

Maninder Gill's picture

 Masaru Goto/World BankAround 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to live with some form of disability, and for 185 million of those, they are severe enough that they have serious difficulty functioning.

As the World Bank renews its commitment to doing more to support people with disabilities, I thought I’d take a moment to reflect on the evolution of my own thinking on disability.  When I was in my teens I thought of disability in black and white terms – there were people with disabilities and there were others, without.

 As I grew up in a small town (by Indian standards) in northern India, my perspectives began to evolve, both through routine observation of the numerous failings of people we see as “able”, and through highly inspiring interactions with people who had so called “disabilities”.  I must say I am in a very different place today than I was as a child.

Why Levi Strauss Is Joining a Race Everyone Can Win

David Love's picture
Also available in: Español | العربية | Français
Phnom Penh, Cambodia Photo: Chhor Sokunthea / World Bank


The global apparel industry has been forced to face some tough and unpleasant realities in recent years, and has been criticized for engaging in a “race to the bottom” especially as it relates to the conditions under which some garments are manufactured.

Shedding Some Light on Worker Skills in Uzbekistan

Mohamed Ihsan Ajwad's picture
When we first set out to answer some basic questions facing policymakers in Uzbekistan, we were unsure what exactly to expect. Little was known about worker skills in Uzbekistan until last year, when two surveys were carried out by international partners. One survey (a joint effort between GIZ and the World Bank) assessed cognitive, non-cognitive, and technical skills of the working age population by interviewing 1,500 households. A second survey (commissioned by the World Bank) interviewed 232 enterprises employing higher education graduates and used a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods to assess employer satisfaction with workers’ skills.

When we analyzed the data for our recent report, “The Skills Road: Skills for Employability in Uzbekistan” what we found was eye-opening.

Jobs for Youth: A Winning Strategy to End Global Poverty

Arup Banerji's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français


Over the past year, much attention in the development community has been focused on reaching two global milestones by 2030: ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity. The World Bank Group and the International Youth Foundation, together with many of our public, private, and philanthropic partners, have recognized that to reach such ambitious goals, the world must achieve broad-based and inclusive economic growth that is focused directly on youth and jobs. Here's why we think pursuing this strategy is such an urgent priority.

Во транзицијата од училиште кон вработување, дали можеме да поттикнеме начин на размислување и определба за раст за да им помогнеме на младите да успеет?

World Bank Mindset Team's picture
Also available in: English


Како најдобро да им помогнеме на децата и младите да успеат во животот?
Ова прашање има највисок приоритет за родителите, едукаторите и креаторите на политики низ целиот свет. Сè поголемо внимание се посветува на клучната улога на социоемоционалните вештини како што се определбата (упорноста) и мотивацијата да се надминат пречките и неуспесите во патот кон успехот. Најновите проминентни примери во фокусот на оваа тема се блогот на Салман Кан (од онлајн академијата на Салман Кан) во Хафингтон пост на оваа тема [1], и неодамнешниот пост во Линкдин на претседателот на Групацијата Светска банка Џим Јонг Ким [2].

In the School-to-Work Transition, Can We Teach a Growth Mindset and Grit to Help Youth Succeed ?

World Bank Mindset Team's picture
Also available in: Македонски



How can we best help children and youth succeed in life?
This question is a top concern among parents, educators and policymakers all over the world. Growing attention has focused on the key role of socio-emotional skills, such as grit (perseverance) and motivation to overcome obstacles and failures, in the path to success. Recent prominent examples of the spotlight on this topic are Salman Khan’s (of the online Khan Academy fame) Huffington Post blog on the subject, and the recent LinkedIn post by  World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim.

Solutions4Work: Partnerships for Jobs and Youth Employment

Arup Banerji's picture

While many economies are recovering from the global recession, there are still 600 million jobs needed to be created over the next decade to maintain today's employment rates. Eliminating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity for the bottom 40 percent of the population by 2030 requires that we engage more effectively to bring hundreds of millions of people into productive work and out of poverty.

While many initiatives on youth employment have been undertaken over the past few years, there is still limited knowledge about the best way to design, implement and coordinate these interventions, and how to link them to broader reforms that promote private investment and business creation and/or expansion. At the same time, the limited knowledge that we do have does not take into account the significant heterogeneity of constraints across settings and different youth populations, and few programs are designed to take into account these differences in context and needs.

Youth Skills, Employability and Creating an “Innovation Culture”

Anush Bezhanyan's picture

Across the globe, young people are a growing share of the labor force. Goals about poverty reduction and shared prosperity depend on the jobs and earnings opportunities they will have.  The technical, cognitive, and behavioral skills (such us teamwork, problem-solving skills and creativity) of workers will determine, to a large extent, their job and earnings opportunities. Unfortunately, around the world, much of the labor force has very low levels of education. Young people graduating from vocational centers or universities often lack the relevant skills for the labor markets.

At this year’s Solutions4Work conference, more than 170 academics, business leaders, and government ministers gathered together in Istanbul, Turkey to discuss challenges and solutions facing countries in addressing youth employment. At the conference, we are particularly energized to hear from youth groups and entrepreneurs from around the world who are creating a movement, change in culture, and tools for their fellow youth.

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