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Path to sustainability: Applying sustainability principles to the World Bank’s internal operations

Shaolin Yang's picture
© World Bank
© World Bank

The World Bank Group is committed to ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity in a sustainable way. This applies to the way the Bank itself operates as well as how we design projects for clients. This means we are always mindful of the Bank’s own impact on the ecosystems, communities, and economies where we have offices.

Sustainability Principles. To this end, we have adopted 10 Sustainability Principles that apply to our internal activities. Linked to the Sustainable Development Goals, these Principles are the bedrock for embedding sustainability in the Bank’s decisions in the following areas: Corporate Real Estate, Corporate Procurement, and Resource Management. Using these Principles in a systematic way will positively impact how we operate our almost 150 facilities worldwide as well as our supply chain.

Swallowed by the Sea…Where coastal infrastructure and jobs meet climate change

Karin Erika Kemper's picture
Also available in: Español | العربية | Français


Life is shifting fast for coastal communities in West Africa. In some areas, coastlines are eroding as much as 10 meters per year. Stronger storms and rising seas are wiping out homes, roads and buildings that have served as landmarks for generations.

I was recently in West Africa to witness the effects of coastal erosion. To understand what’s going on, we took a three-country road trip, traveling from Benin’s capital Cotonou, along the coast to Lomé in Togo and then to Keta and Accra in Ghana. These three countries, among the hardest hit by coastal erosion, offer a snapshot of what is happening along the rest of the coast, from Mauritania, via Senegal to Nigeria. 

Packing a library of knowledge in a carry-on: Attending the Public Debt Management Workshop in Vienna

Mario Augusto Caetano Joao's picture
© World Bank


I travel light. Usually a carry-on is all I need for business related travel. Attending the Government Debt Management Strategy Design and Implementation Workshops, organized by World Bank Treasury, was no different affair. The month was July, the location was JVI Facilities in Vienna, I thought I didn’t need more luggage!

I attended the workshop wearing two different hats: as a former senior economic advisor to the Angolan government and a macro economist, I was eager to find out what I could add to my information portfolio in terms of debt management know-how; as a World Bank Group Advisor to Executive Director, I was curious about how the Bank builds capacity through training for member countries.

Girls’ education and the future of a nation

Sri Mulyani Indrawati's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية | 中文
School girls in Berastagi, North Sumatra, Indonesia. © Axel Drainville via CreativeCommons
School girls in Berastagi, North Sumatra, Indonesia. © Axel Drainville via Creative Commons

In 1978, we both started our high school education in our home city of Semarang. Our alma mater is located on a major artery in the heart of the city, and occupies a beautiful Dutch colonial building. The robustness of its architecture befits the reputation of our school at that time: a school led by a passionate principal who promoted discipline and effective learning.

In our school, every boy and girl had an equal opportunity to learn and thrive. This is something Raden Ajeng Kartini –national heroine and a pioneer for girls and women’s rights in Indonesia– had fought for. The school was fully equipped with labs for chemistry, physics, biology, and foreign languages. We were fortunate to have the opportunity to receive quality education at one of the best public schools in Semarang. Our school also fared well at the provincial and national level. 

Sharing the future of open access

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture


On October 26, as part of the World Bank’s celebration of the 10th International Open Access week, I moderated a panel discussion on behalf of the Bank and the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC). Experts shared their experiences, success stories, and identified remaining challenges in advancing Open Access. External participants and Bank Group staff were invited to the event, which was also live-streamed and recorded

Why distressed asset resolution is important to development finance

Joaquim Levy's picture
© Jonathan Ernst/World Bank
© Jonathan Ernst/World Bank

Addressing high levels of non-performing loans (NPLs) is key to preserving financial stability and an important element of an integrated development agenda. High levels of NPLs lock in capital that could support fresh lending, and they create a negative macro-financial feedback loop, as debt overhang depresses borrowers’ investment and consumption decisions. High NPLs have particularly adverse implications in emerging market and developing economies (EMDEs), which lack fully developed capital markets and where credit is provided mostly by banks. Hence expanding the role of debt servicing companies and a secondary market for distressed debt is a constructive strategy: it should be a priority in most EMDEs.

Steps to increase cooperation between national development banks, the private sector and multilateral banks

Ceyla Pazarbasioglu's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية



The program of events at the just concluded 2017 World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings was rich, and covered a range of topics instrumental to the World Bank Group’s work.

However, the event closest to my heart was on the role national development banks (NDBs) can play to close the staggering financing gap needed to reach the Sustainable Development Goals, nicknamed going “from billions to trillions” of dollars.

Since the SDGs were announced, the international development community has been looking at ways to tap into new funding venues, attract the private sector and build relevant private-public sector partnerships.

National development banks are important: they are key in attracting and mobilizing private sector funding.

Reflections on the fifth anniversary of the Open Knowledge Repository

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture


This blog post is a part of the International Open Access Week blog series. 

Five years ago, the World Bank Open Knowledge Repository (OKR) was launched, making the most recent publications and research easily discoverable and freely available to the general public. Stuart Tucker, the OKR’s Curator, was there from the very beginning. He shares his thoughts and experiences in today’s blog. We also invite you to join us online for our International Open Access Week panel discussion today from 2:00-3:30pm ET at live.worldbank.org.
 


When it was first suggested that the World Bank should have an Open Access “repository,” I joined a small team charged with designing and building it.  As I attended my first Open Repository conference, I witnessed the blossoming field of activity within the Open Access community.

Streamlining open access (OA) for World Bank authors

Elisa Liberatori Prati's picture
This blog post is a part of the International Open Access Week blog series

Today’s contributor to our International Open Access Week blog series is Mayya Revzina, Copyright Officer/Rights Manager in ITS Knowledge and Information. Among other things, she works with academic publishers to streamline the process for World Bank authors who publish in non-Bank journals and to enable those articles to be made open access:
 
The World Bank launched its Open Access Policy in 2012 as part of its Open Development Agenda to enable the widest possible dissemination of its research and knowledge and to increase the users’ ability to discover and use pertinent information. The OA Policy mandated that Bank knowledge products shall be made available to the public under Creative Commons (CC) licenses.

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