Syndicate content

Why Investing in Poor Countries Helps All of Us

Jim Yong Kim's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية

Many people have the misconception that my field -- global development -- is just about do-gooders and charities helping the poor. To be sure, many charitable groups are doing generous, laudable work. But global development extends far beyond charity and has a greater impact on the global economy than most people think.

Strong economic growth in developing countries became an engine for the global economy after the 2008-09 financial crisis, accounting for roughly 50 percent of all global growth. In addition, fully half of the United States’ exports now go to emerging markets and developing economies.

Global economic development can be good for your bottom line. Our focus is on helping more than a billion poor people lift themselves out of extreme poverty and on boosting the incomes of the poorest 40 percent in developing countries. To do that, we need to find economic growth strategies that help all segments of society in emerging markets -- reaching even fragile states striving to put years of conflict behind them and to create good jobs for their people.

The question I ask my team all the time is, what’s our plan? Increasingly scarce public funding isn’t enough to get the job done. We need to attract private sector investment that creates jobs. Ninety percent of all jobs in the developing world are created by the private sector. If we have high aspirations for the poor and vulnerable, there is no argument: We need the private sector to flourish, even in the poorest countries.

Food Waste -- a Bigger Problem Than You Thought

Jim Yong Kim's picture
Also available in: Español | Français

Here's a shameful statistic: up to a third of the world's food is wasted. In the developing world, that's 400 to 500 calories per person per day. But in the developed world, it's as much as 1,500 calories per person.

We cannot afford to waste that much food. About 842 million people today don't get enough to eat, and 98 percent of them live in developing countries.

In developing countries, food is lost on farms or on the way to market due to poor infrastructure and storage. In developed countries, food is wasted at the retail level and by consumers.

All of us have to take action. Every country -- and every person -- needs to minimize food waste as a part of the fight against poverty and hunger.

A Day with Brazil’s Innovative Bolsa Familia Program

Mohamad Al-Arief's picture

Field Visit to Escola Municipal Almirante Tamandare, Vidigal, Brazil

This week I’ve been participating in the World Bank’s South-South Learning Forum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where policymakers from 70 countries are sharing their experiences and discussing practical solutions for successful social protection programs.

Taking Communities of Practice Global

This week in Brazil, policy-makers and experts gather together for a week long south-south forum where ideas and innovations in delivering social protection systems are shared.  Participants were able to learn and exchange knowledge on implementing systems and possible synergies with related social areas such as nutrition, health and employment programs.

Albania’s Story: Reaching the poor in social protection systems

Erion Veliaj's picture

Albania's Story: Reaching the poor through social protection systems
At this year’s south-south forum on labor and social protection systems, organized by the World Bank and the government of Brazil this week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, I had the opportunity to present Albania’s story on modernizing the country’s “Ndihma Ekonomike” cash transfer program.  The term “Ndihma Ekonomike” refers to providing support to vulnerable groups or families in need. But how do we determine who are eligible?

In Brazil, South-South Exchange Promotes Innovations in Social Protection Systems

Anush Bezhanyan's picture

This week, the World Bank, in partnership with the government of Brazil and the State of Rio de Janeiro, is co-hosting a South-South Learning Forum to promote knowledge exchange among policymakers from developing countries on ways to improve the design of social protection and labor systems at the policy, program and service delivery levels.

A 10-Hour Crash Course in Japanese Solidarity and Resilience

Joaquin Toro's picture


After more than two hours stranded at a small town train station near Tokyo, Japan, with record snowfall and freezing temperatures outside our windows, the train driver addressed us for the third time – no new updates. “Our personnel are working to fix the problem,” the voice said. At that moment, an older man seated next to me leaned over and told me, “We have to do our part; the people working in the snow are trying their best to fix the system, so we can move. We should remain calm and wait - we cannot be part of the problem.” I was starting to understand why Japanese are so resilient.
 
This adventure began last February, following my participation in the launch of the new, $100 million joint program between Japan and the World Bank for disaster risk reduction. This program, implemented by the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), will benefit a large number of especially vulnerable countries around the world.  As part of this new initiative, the World Bank also launched the Disaster Risk Management Tokyo Hub.
 
The launch for the Tokyo Hub was held at a high level symposium at the Japan Keidanren (Japan Business Federation) on February 3, which attracted more than 400 people and had substantial media coverage.  The Senior Vice-Minister for Finance/Senior Vice-Minister for Reconstruction Jiro Aichi (a native of Sendai) spoke of Japan's commitment to disaster risk management (DRM) and thanked the World Bank for its strong support, before kicking off an intense program of inter-agency meetings to better utilize Japanese expertise in DRM practices.
 
My experience with Japanese solidarity and resilience, however, was best highlighted the day I was returning home. On February 9, as I was trying to get to Narita airport, more than 27 centimeters of snow fell on Tokyo and other areas of Japan, the heaviest of 40 years. Many buildings in the city collapsed, leaving at least 11 dead and more than 1,200 injured across the country.

World Bank adds maps to Google Maps Gallery, opening data for the world to see

Aleem Walji's picture
Also available in: 中文

Neil Fantom, Manager, Development Data Group, Nicole Klingen, Sector Manager,Health, Nutrition and Population, and Aleem Walji, Director, Innovation Labs at the World Bank guest blogged on Google's Blog space today to explain how the World Bank's data is being showcased on Google's new Maps Gallery. Read the full blog post.

Making International Women's Day Count

Nigel Twose's picture

A question dominated discussions ahead of International Women’s Day on March 8: How can we make it count?
 
Gender equality and empowerment are principles that have been widely adopted for some time; but for many women, particularly those in developing countries, action lags way behind the rhetoric. The same is true in business: Evidence abounds for the business case for investing in women, but the reality remains that for a lot of women, things at work haven’t progressed much beyond what their mothers experienced.
 
It makes sense then that the issues that came up time and again during a panel I participated in at the sixth annual meeting of the UN's Women's Empowerment Principles (WEPs)  titled “Jobs, Gender and Development: Confronting the Global Challenge," mainly related to the enduring challenges women face at work. I had gone there thinking I had much to add to that topic, but I came away having learned more than I could share, about topics I hadn’t expected.

Pages