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What Does It Take For Turkey To Close The Regional Gap?

Can Selçuki's picture
Also available in: Türkçe
When our friends who are new to Turkey arrive in Istanbul, they are often surprised to find a developed country. Then they may be told that the west of the country is well developed, but there are regions in the east that are really lagging behind. However, upon a visit to Gaziantep or Kayseri, they realize that these cities are doing much better than they initially thought with developing industry and rapid urbanization.

So what  is the story about regional inequalities in Turkey?

Each Day I See Killing

Bassam Sebti's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

The young boy stood before his father’s corpse, wailing. He could not believe that his father, who had gone out for breakfast, had ended up dead. He was blown up by a suicide bomber in one of Baghdad’s busiest restaurants in 2005.

I was covering the bombing attack for The Washington Post when I saw the boy becoming another digit in the count of war victims. In the news, he might be a number but in reality he became an orphan whose loss would add to the obstacles of achieving sustainable development.

When I was a reporter in my war-torn country of Iraq, I saw death every single day, in schools, markets, buses, and even worship areas. What is worse is that this is still happening, not only in Iraq but also in many other countries. Conflicts, wars, sectarianism, and racism have become a daily occurrence in the news, and it is just too disturbing.

TÜRKİYE’NİN BÖLGESEL FARKLILIKLARI KAPATMASI İÇİN NE YAPMASI GEREKİYOR?

Can Selçuki's picture
Also available in: English
Türkiye’yi daha önce tanımayan dostlarımız İstanbul’a geldiklerinde gelişmiş bir ülke ile karşılaşınca şaşırıyorlar. Bu durumda ilk aldıkları açıklama ülkede ikili bir ekonominin olduğu ve tipik olarak ülkenin batısının gelişmiş olduğu, ama doğuda gerçekten geri kalmış bölgelerin bulunduğu oluyor. Ancak, Gaziantep veya Kayseri gibi bir şehri ziyaret ettiklerinde, bu şehirlerin gelişmekte olan sanayileri ve hızlı şehirleşmeleri ile aslında düşündüklerinden çok daha iyi bir durumda olduklarını fark ediyorlar.

Peki, bunun ardında yatan hikaye nedir?

Will cheap oil lead to cheap food?

Juergen Voegele's picture
Also available in: 中文

The halving of world oil prices over the last six months raises questions about the implications for food prices and the welfare of poor people.
 
Do lower oil prices mean lower food prices? To a certain extent. But for low-energy cropping systems common in most developing countries, and in areas where food is not transported far, the impact will be dampened. For large oil exporters, however, food prices may increase. In general, lower oil prices should lower the cost of moving food from producers to consumers and reduce on-farm fuel and fertilizer costs. But a countervailing factor is that cheap oil may also induce people to drive more, and as fuel ethanol mandates link biofuel use to overall fuel use, ethanol use and the volume of maize used to produce it would also go up. In countries where oil is a large share of exports, real exchange rates may depreciate, which will disproportionately increase the price of traded goods like grains relative to other prices.
 
Is the downturn in agriculture commodity prices necessarily bad for farmers who produce food? A major downturn in commodity prices would not be great for farm incomes, and high crop yields would be needed to help dampen the effect on farm profits.  Lower fertilizer and transport costs may help mitigate any negative impacts.
 
How long will oil prices remain low? While there is no certainty in forecasts, current estimates suggest fuel prices will remain low for 2015, increasingly slightly in 2016. There are three main drivers of the oil price decline which are structural: Significant increases in US shale oil production, receding concerns of oil supply disruptions in the Middle East, and a change in OPEC policy to maintain rather than cut production.

Are women traveling into a safer 2015?

Priyali Sur's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español
NEW DELHI—It happened outside a plush mall in Gurgaon, a booming financial and industrial hub just southwest of the Indian capital.  A 21-year old woman, a newcomer to the city, hopped into a shared taxi after finishing her second day at work. “Only when the driver started taking me through deserted streets did I realize that this was his personal car and not a shared taxi,” she tells me of that night two years ago. “He took me to a lonely place, hit me, threatened me, and raped me. I wish I knew it wasn’t a cab. I wish there was a safe way to travel.”
 

Making Research Relevant to Avoid a Megadisaster

Simone Balog's picture
 Earthquakes from Roger Bilham (Science, 2006); Population from Landscan (Oak Ridge Nat. Lab., 2004)
Graphic from Ross Stein (USGS, 2013) and Volkan Sevilgen (Seismicity.net, 2013); Earthquake data from Roger Bilham (Science, 2006); Population data from Landscan (Oak Ridge Nat. Lab., 2004)

Without concerted action, the world will one day see a megadisaster—a disaster resulting in over 1 million casualties.

The forces of population growth and rapid urbanization are dramatically increasing exposure to disaster risk. Over 600 million people, for example, live in the Ganges Basin of India, Nepal and Bangladesh. Due to the meeting of the tectonic plates with the Indian subcontinent shifting under the Eurasian continent, this area is at a large risk of seismic activity. And indeed, the Ganges Basin has seen earthquakes over magnitude 7.0 in the past 500 years, as illustrated by the graphic above.

As practitioners, we can help reduce disaster risk and build resilience to potential catastrophes through smart development practices. These practices, however, require targeted research that can inform which levers to move, and how to move them. Sadly, this kind of research is difficult to come by in the disaster risk management community, and harder still to communicate to those that need it most.

Each Day I See Change. What Do You See?

Korina Lopez's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | العربية
The mural, called 'The Wait,' painted on the outside of Washington D.C. restaurant Mothership.

After the riots following Martin Luther King’s assassination in 1968, Georgia Avenue and its surrounding neighborhoods in Washington D.C. were stuck in time. Houses and businesses looked run down, and there weren’t many visitors—unless you counted the traffic along Georgia Avenue, one of the main roads to connect Maryland and Washington D.C. Fast forward to 2015 and brand new condo buildings tower over 100-year old houses. Shiny new restaurants pop up next to ones that have been in the same family for generations.  I see longtime residents and millennials waiting for the bus. It seems the only thing that’s stayed the same is the traffic. Some call these recent changes revitalization, others gentrification.

What do you see every day that you want to change?

Mario Trubiano's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | العربية | 中文

No matter where in the world you live, you see and experience things every day that make you think; that upset or inspire you; that you wish were different; or that give you hope. Instead of walking past, ignoring, or pretending there’s not an issue, we want you to capture an image and share it to help raise awareness of the issues where you live.

Today the World Bank turns to you—global citizens—to give faces to the seemingly insurmountable issues you experience, like access to clean water, corruption, clean stoves, sanitation, gender inequality, or any number of other real challenges your community faces. We’re launching the #EachDayISee contest on Instagram to share photos of the world around us, to help draw attention to the myriad of economic and social issues facing communities all around the world.
 

#EachDayISee

Managing EU Funds – What We Can Learn from Slovenia

Maya V. Gusarova's picture
Effective management of European Union (EU) funds is not only high on the agenda of the new EU member states but also of the Western Balkan countries that are progressing in the EU integration process. As such, these countries face several important challenges and questions today.

On becoming an EU member, how much will the budget calendar and its preparation need to change? How best to plan and execute projects which are pre-financed? How to record unspent EU funds in the next fiscal year? To what extent should the Ministry of Finance be involved in the process before the signing of financial agreements with the EU? These and other questions arise in relation to the impact on a country’s fiscal position, co-financing obligations, pre-financings and bridging resources, and payment of errors.

#BestOf2014: Six Popular Environmental Stories You Shouldn’t Miss

Andy Shuai Liu's picture
As we get ready to kick off the new year, let’s recount the voices and stories about how we can enhance the way we interact with our planet. From Ethiopia to Indonesia, we’ve seen our efforts improve lives and help incomes grow as countries and communities strive for greener landscapes, healthier oceans and cleaner air.
 
Take a look back at some of the most popular stories you may have missed in 2014:
 
1. Raising More Fish to Meet Rising DemandPhoto by Nathan Jones via Flickr CC BY-NC 2.0

Aquaculture is on the rise to help feed a growing population. New #Fish2030 report: http://t.co/0fbH4fLDJO http://t.co/Lm5eHsGZaR

— World Bank (@WorldBank) February 6, 2014

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