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No Water, No Food Security

Diego Juan Rodriguez's picture

July was the hottest month on record in the U.S. and with it the price of maize jumped 23 percent. According to very rough estimate made in a blog from the Wall Street Journal, this means just $33 more at the register next year for the average U.S. grocery shopper. But it means much more for poor people in developing countries, who already spend up to 60 percent of their income on food.

Welcome to World Water Week 2012

Jaehyang So's picture

Thousands of water development practitioners have begun to descend upon Stockholm for World Water Week, the annual knowledge-sharing event hosted by the Stockholm International Water Institute. It was raining earlier today in Sweden’s capital. But some parts of the world have suffered through unprecedented high temperatures and drought. The drought in the US can be seen from space, as described in this Wired magazine article. This drought has led to damages to, and drops in, yields of crops of maize and soybeans, for which the US is the largest exporter in the world. It has also meant higher food prices.

Gates Foundation Awards "Toilet for the Future"

Soma Ghosh Moulik's picture

... and the winner is an entry from the California Institute of Technology! Michael Hoffman received the prize for the "Reinvent the Toilet Challenge" from Bill Gates himself on August 14, 2012 in Seattle. The award winning technology model is based on a self-contained, sun-powered system that recycles water and breaks down human waste into storable energy.

Does Sanitation as a Human Right = Free Toilets?

Craig Kullmann's picture

Earlier this month, the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), Nordic Human Rights Trust Fund, and the World Bank’s Sanitation Thematic Group hosted Catarina de Albuquerque, the first UN Special Rapporteur on the human right to sanitation and safe drinking water. She discussed the human right to sanitation with sector and human rights experts, and what it means in practice. One of the most notable questions she addressed was--- if something is a human right, does that mean it has to be free? 


Lessons from Hackers

Julia Bucknall's picture

It’s been almost 8 months since the World Bank Group convened the first Water Hackathon.  The Water Hackathon brought nearly 1000 computer programmers in 10 cities around the world together to compete to build prototype solutions to challenges in water, including sanitation.  We had worked to help governments, utilities, civil society groups, World Bank experts, and citizens define their specific water problems.  Overall, more than 60 prototype solutions were built in response to the 113 water sector challenges defined.  Some

How Can Cooperation in International Waters in Africa (CIWA) Reach Its Goals?

Gustavo Saltiel's picture

Africa’s development agenda is inherently regional due to the large number of landlocked countries (15) and trans-boundary rivers (63 basins), as well as an uneven distribution of energy resources and load centers. Though Africa is endowed with a generous supply of water resources, most of its rivers, lakes and aquifers cross country borders - the Nile crosses 10, the Niger 9, the Senegal 4, and the Zambezi 8. This therefore calls for cooperative water resource management and coordinated investments to increase basin yields of food, power, and other economic opportunities, while strengthening environmental sustainability and mitigating the effects of droughts and floods.

A true PPP is all about the last P - Partnership

Ella Lazarte's picture

Private sector participation provides a promising solution to sustainable management and financing of water services, but we must bear in mind that a true PPP is all about the last P, partnership. At the Training Day preceding the PPP conference here in Dakar, Jane Jamieson said that PPP is not a date, it’s a marriage – you have to wake up next to it for the next 15-20 years (or 5 years or less for those management or lease/affermage contracts in countries such as Benin, Uganda, and Mozambique). So how do we make sure that it is indeed a true partnership? 

Strengthening Cooperative Management of International Waters in Africa

Gustavo Saltiel's picture

Cooperation in International Waters in Africa (CIWA) was launched by the Africa Water Resources Management Unit of the World Bank.

The idea is for CIWA to support and assist riparian governments in Africa to work together to address and unlock the constraints on growth and development posed by international waters. The program is supported by various Development Partners, including the UK’s Department for International Development, Denmark and Norway.

New Generation of Water Ambassadors

Christopher Walsh's picture

As a practice there has been a lot of attention recently on innovation in the water sector. And while innovation might mean using new technology to help solve old problems, it also means looking at a problem from a different angle to find possible solutions. In this post from Sana Agha Al Nimer, Senior Water Specialist at the World Bank, she shares her firsthand account of how speaking to children about water issues is a powerful tool for the sector. 

 

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