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Time to focus on water management in Arab world as source of growth and stability

Anders Jagerskog's picture
Co-authored by Pasquale Steduto, FAO Regional Coordinator for the Near East and North Africa

In Gaza, the drinking water tastes like seawater. Years of neglect and poor management, due in large part to recurring conflicts, has led to the steady depletion of Gaza’s natural aquifer. The empty aquifer has been invaded by seawater and, alarming for public health, untreated sewage.

A series of droughts that struck Syria from 2006 onwards destroyed the livelihoods of millions of Syrians who relied on agriculture.  The United Nations (UN) estimated that between 2008 and 2011, the drought affected 1.3 million people, with 800 000 people “severely affected.” People were forced from their land, poverty levels rose, and part of the population was plunged into deep food insecurity.

To continue reading the blog post, visit the World Bank's Middle East and North Africa Blog for the original post. 
 
Download the Report "Water Management in Fragile Systems: Building Resilience to Shocks and Protracted Crises in The Middle East and North Africa"

 

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