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If You Could Help End Extreme Poverty, Would You? We Can. Let's Take It On.

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: Français | Español



Talent is everywhere, but opportunities are not. That’s the conventional belief.

Today, after listening to some amazing young people speak about their lives at Thursday’s End Poverty event at the World Bank, I’m convinced that opportunities are omnipresent.

These youth have one thing in common: They all want to take on poverty and want everyone else to join them. For the first time in history, we can end extreme poverty, and we can do it by 2030. It’s the right thing to do.

Confucius, a Chinese philosopher who lived in the fifth century B.C., said that when we are faced with what’s right, “to leave it undone shows a lack of courage.” Today, four inspiring youth leaders were at the World Bank Group in Washington, D.C. to do what is right by helping to launch a global movement to end extreme poverty by 2030.

One of them, Chernor Bah, was born during a civil war in the slums of Freetown, the capital city of Sierra Leone. Access to basic needs such as food was a privilege for him. His mom’s resilience helped him get education, he passionately told an energetic, youthful crowd. When he grew up he took it upon himself to mobilize young people to help increase access to education. Today he serves as the chairman of the Youth Advocacy Group for the Global Education First Initiative. Its goal is “to accelerate progress towards the Education for All goals and the education-related Millennium Development Goals.”

A Young African Entrepreneur Invests in Caterpillars to Fight Malnutrition

Anne Senges's picture

Eating shea caterpillars

While the shea tree is known for its nuts, used to produce a butter to which myriad benefits have been attributed (skin and nutritional, in particular), much less is known about the caterpillars that feed on its leaves. And this is precisely what a young man from Burkina Faso has set out to change. 

Education Helps Afghanistan’s Youth Rebuild Their War-Torn Nation

Bassam Sebti's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español | 中文

It was once called “the Burned School” and children weren’t able to attend classes. Just like many other things affected by years of conflict in Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul, Nahid Shahid School was the victim of violence that destroyed many aspects of the country.

World Radio Day: Celebrating Young People

Michael Boampong's picture

Yesterday, we celebrated radio, one of the most important means of communication in our times. It is the only means of entertainment and information in some places. Recently, I (Michael Boampong aka M.B.) met with Curious Minds, a Ghana-based youth development organization, to learn about their radio show, “Gems of Our Time,” and how radio plays a role even in today’s digital age.

How Youth Saved Bananas in Uganda

Ravi Kumar's picture
Bananas

Imagine yourself living in Uganda, a landlocked country in East Africa, where more than 14 million people eat bananas almost daily. In fact, as a resident in Uganda, chances are you and everyone you know is consuming 0.7 kg of bananas per day. Citizens of no other country in the world eat more bananas than Ugandans.
 

Listening to 7 Billion Voices

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | 中文

What have you learned from your parents? What do you want to pass on to your children? What difficult circumstances have you been through?

How would you answer these questions?

By asking the same questions on elementary matters to thousands of people around the world, a web project has collected precious clues that we – the 7+ billion individuals currently living on Earth – have a lot more in common than we may think.

A Secure Life for Young People, at Home or Abroad

Michael Boampong's picture

Last fall, I had the honor of speaking to participants at the 13th Melaka International Youth Dialogue, which focused on youth migration. I spoke about general trends of youth migration and the increasing number of young people who move within and across countries and regions, a situation that is influencing the human development of young people either positively or negatively.

YouThink! Year in Review

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: Français
I'm amazed by how young people around the world are innovating despite the numerous challenges they face. Their participation in the fight against poverty is crucial. At the World Bank, we know we can't end extreme poverty by 2030 without empowering youth.

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