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Taking Action on Climate Change for the Youth of the World

Lachlan Hoyle's picture
© Conor Ashleigh

The risks created by climate change are well known. Regardless of political views, when the majority of respected and leading science institutions say that climate change is happening, I believe that we have a problem. 

From a young person’s perspective, I do not want to inherit a world that is torn apart by an issue that could have been minimized if we all took action. I don’t want a world that is destroyed by inaction and pointless bickering. If we continue to do nothing, or not enough, we will all be living in a world that could have been prevented. Inaction will tear our world apart.

Empowering Girls and Young Women: What Works

Bassam Sebti's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Español | العربية | Français
 Dana Smillie / World Bank

When Laila returned home from school in rural Yemen, she did not expect what her father, Nasser, had in store for her: a husband, a much older husband.

Five Reasons Why Youth Should Choose Agriculture

Andy Shuai Liu's picture
What type of career do you aspire to have? Do you want to be an artist, a business person, or a policymaker?
 
Or, have you ever wanted to become a farmer? I would not be surprised if you said no.
 

How Young People Can Make Governments More Open and Responsive

Victoria Flamant's picture

Did you know that today is International Youth Day? It was started by the United Nations in 1999 to bring youth issues to the attention of the international community and celebrate the potential of youth as partners in today’s global society.

What does it mean to be a Young Professional at the World Bank?

Megha Mukim's picture
The road ahead is long and steep, and I have miles to go before I sleep.
The road ahead is long and steep,
​and I have miles to go before I sleep.
Many apply for the Young Professionals Program. A few make it to the interview, and fewer still make it all the way. By the time you’re hired you think you're special, because you managed to do what others couldn't. You'd be wrong.

​Young professionals are special, but it is not really our abilities that set us apart, it’s the opportunities we’re offered. We're encouraged and motivated to work outside our comfort zone. For instance, those with academic accomplishments are usually shipped off to work in operations. Your research shows that economic clusters lead to productivity gains? Why don’t you work with a team helping a sub-Saharan African country design industrial zones. You come with private-sector consulting experience? Perhaps you should work on setting up a platform to collate and compile knowledge for the institution.

Beijing+20: Unfinished Business?

Thato Mabudusha's picture

 © Curt Carnemark / World Bank
Women's group. Kenya. Photo: © Curt Carnemark / World Bank

It has been nearly two decades since the Fourth Women’s Conference in Beijing in 1995. The conference was a milestone in the advancement of women’s empowerment, because it highlighted the pertinent issues women face. We have come a long way since 1995. From the implementation of gender equity policies in the workplace to coordinated action on violence against women and human trafficking, we have seen commendable progress.

Age Is Nothing but a Number: Bridging the Gap between the Young and the Old

Viva Dadwal's picture
Does this sound familiar?
 
“Why are young people so loud, lazy, and destructive?”
 
“We’re looking for a more mature candidate to handle this job.”
 
Now, what about this?
 
“Why are old people so boring, slow, and angry all the time?”
 
“We need young, dynamic graduates with energy to join our team.”

 

Côte d’Ivoire’s Emerging Young Entrepreneurs

Jamie Lee's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Kone Gninlnagnon

Kone Gninlnagnon is a young entrepreneur who dreams of exporting rice from Côte d’Ivoire to the world.

But he knows the quality of the rice must be improved and tested in the domestic market first. Thus, a new business idea was born: helping to make homegrown rice more competitive. “We cannot win the loyalty of consumers with bad quality rice,” he says. His project, “Riz Ivoire,” would promote the rice that comes from the heart of Côte d’Ivoire and help deliver high-quality rice to Ivorian dining tables. He also wants to encourage other Ivorian youth to invest in “rizculture.”

Now Gninlnagnon is one step closer to achieving his dream. His project won third place in the Start-up Competition at ICI 2014, the Fourth Côte d‘Ivoire National Investment Forum that took place in the city of Abidjan in January. While the three-day event focused on investment opportunities in the country’s key sectors like agriculture, industry, and infrastructure, the spotlight of the closing ceremony fell on entrepreneurship and the youth of Côte d’Ivoire, as they are the drivers of future growth and innovation in the post-conflict country. Côte d’Ivoire aims to be an emerging market economy by 2020. In 2013, the country’s growth rate was 8.7%.

Young and Eager to Work on Policymaking: A Few Inspiring Examples

Liviane Urquiza's picture

Some preconceptions are universal. Whether  in Europe, South America, East or South Asia, in urban or rural areas, pretty much everywhere I have been I have heard young people explain why they dislike politics, either because it is boring or because they believe all politicians are corrupt. Did they – did you? – ever wonder what the world would be like if there were no policies, and no policymakers? Think about it.

5 Things You Need to Know about Open Government

Ravi Kumar's picture


The Internet is abuzz with articles and commentary on how to make government more open. Open government benefits us all. The end result makes governments efficient and responsive, ultimately improving citizens’ lives. Here are some simple answers to questions on open government. Of course, a list like this always needs a disclaimer: This article doesn’t provide you a comprehensive understanding of the open government movement. But it’s a start.

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