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February 2010

Shakira brings hope for kids in Latin America (and some glamour to the World Bank...)

Saadia Iqbal's picture

In a place full of economists and other nerdy types, glamour is hard to come by. That's right, I'm talking about the World Bank (with the exception of the Youthink! team, of course).

So, it was pretty exciting when pop superstar Shakira visited the other day.

Even more exciting, though, is the project that Shakira came to launch: a $300 million partnership with the World Bank to invest in children in the Latin America and Caribbean region.

Preserving the “authentic”? Changing lifestyles in North Eastern Kenya

Siena Anstis's picture

The pastoral lifestyle in Kenya has made headlines around the world. Faced with the worst drought in memory, 2009 has been a difficult year for communities like the North Eastern Somali Kenyans.

The extreme weather conditions that Kenya is facing—intense drought followed by torrential rains—will probably get worse. Pastoral communities need to find ways to survive beyond demeaning foreign handouts that only prolong their unreliable lifestyle without offering sustainable new options.

Accessing Education in the Midst of War and Violence

Yasmine Cathell's picture

Mother Teresa once said that she would never join an anti-war demonstration, but she would be the first to join a pro-peace rally. The idea behind this statement is that what you resist persists and in the act of opposing you are actually acknowledging and reaffirming the existence of whatever it is you are trying to stop. The key is to focus on the solution and not the problem. Unfortunately this fundamental principle is rarely applied to conflict zones and peace-building. 

Business Unusual?

Saadia Iqbal's picture

 The climate is changing, and we should, too! This according to Sunita Narain, the Director of the Center for Science and Environment in New Delhi. At a recent forum at the World Bank, she stressed the need for governments, policymakers and international organizations to start thinking differently about development. This is the only way, she says, to reach those who are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. No more thinking "business as usual;" rather, it's time to wake up and realize it's "business unusual!"

Twitter: Not Just a Dating Tool

Siena Anstis's picture

In Tolstoy’s novel, War and Peace, Pierre, a young noble, does some philanthropic work in the Russian wastelands. His projects complete, he is thanked profusely by the women, peasants and priests, whom he thought he had benefited. Satisfied, he returns home full of self-worth. However, it soon becomes clear that Pierre had not helped anyone. In fact—working without cultural context or experience—he has aggravated the situation.

Is credit just another form of cancer?

Yasmine Cathell's picture

Host brotherI was sitting at the dinner table in Cochabamba Bolivia, when my host brother asked: “How is it possible that Americans all have a car, a house and a big TV?” I think he was hoping I would let him in on some big secret but instead I explained that most Americans don’t actually own their car or house.

Get Ready to Change the World!

Saadia Iqbal's picture

Muster all your creativity and innovation, because now is your chance to solve real-world issues like hunger, poverty, disease, conflict and climate change. Get ready to play EVOKE.

EVOKE
is a new game brought out by the World Bank Institute. It empowers you— young people all over the world—to plunge right into the challenge and look for creative solutions. 

Development, the simple way, changes girls' lives

Siena Anstis's picture

While development is riddled with complex acronyms and detailed budgets, sometimes the least intricate programs are the most effective. The Girls’ Forum is one example. Implemented by Education for Marginalized Children of Kenya (EMACK) in Kenya’s Coast and North East Province, the program has altered the lives of many young women. 

Youth in Development: Experts Brainstorm About How to Improve Particpation

Saadia Iqbal's picture

 At a recent discussion organized by the World Bank Institute, 7 panelists shared ideas about why it's so important for youth to be involved in development, and how everyone--young people, organizations, and governments--can work together to make this happen even more than it is already happening.