Youthink! The World Bank's blog for youth
Syndicate content

Liviane Urquiza's blog

Health

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | Español

Fiche thématique Youthink!

Definition: Physical, mental, and social well-being.

Good health is an important foundation for economic growth and a thriving society. In the developing world, poor health produces a vicious cycle: the same conditions that create poverty put health at increased risk. Hazardous conditions include unsafe and unclean environments, inadequate nutrition, and lack of access to medical care. Societies emerging from conflict often have a population at increased risk of mental health problems. Individuals in any crisis situation are at increased risk of mental health problems. Read the issue brief »
 

Listening to 7 Billion Voices

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | 中文

What have you learned from your parents? What do you want to pass on to your children? What difficult circumstances have you been through?

How would you answer these questions?

By asking the same questions on elementary matters to thousands of people around the world, a web project has collected precious clues that we – the 7+ billion individuals currently living on Earth – have a lot more in common than we may think.

World AIDS Day 2013: An Overview

Liviane Urquiza's picture
© World BankAs a symbol of its commitment to combating AIDS, the World Bank Group places the red ribbon on the facade of its headquarters in Washington.

 
Every year, December 1 serves as a reminder that despite the scientific advances made in recent years, AIDS remains pervasive across the world and continues to claim victims. Sustained commitment is critical if we wish to halt the spread of the virus and its devastating impact on poverty reduction efforts.

In a guidance document, the World Health Organization emphasizes the importance of improving access by adolescents (aged 10 to 19) to preventive services, treatment, and care. The establishment of free screening programs would provide this population segment with access to earlier treatment and limit the risk of infection by those unaware of their seropositive status.

Youth Video Contest Winners Offer Solutions to Poverty

Liviane Urquiza's picture

Youth Video Contest Winners Offer Solutions to Poverty

When you are young and still in school, it’s hard to think of ways you can change people’s thinking at the global level. But sometimes, all you need is a video camera and Internet access.

Today, the winners of the European Development Days video contest “Young voices against poverty,” are being recognized for their contributions to the dialogue on global poverty.

In the Midst of the Slums, a Pool of Talent Waiting to be Tapped

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

Transforming the slums from within
Children from the Mukuru Talent Development center showcasing their creativity in the Lunga Lunga slum in Kenya.

From Bombay to Manila to the favelas in Rio, more than one billion people are estimated to be currently living in slums. According to the United Nations, this figure is expected to surpass the two billion mark by 2030.

With no roof or solid walls and no access to clean water or toilets, living conditions in the slums are unhygienic and hazardous. Considering that approximately 70% of slum dwellers are under 30, the future of the slums rests in the hands of the young generations. What do these youth need to reverse the trend and improve the daily lives of slum dwellers? 

Girls and Technology Can Change the World

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français

Young woman working on a computer.
Young woman working on a computer. Tunis, Tunisia. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank

“Girls programming isn’t just a cool thing; it’s also doubling the chances of developing innovative tools and making the world a better place for everyone.” These words are from my friend Julie, who has been working as a web developer for the last four years. She has also been involved in a few volunteer programs in Africa, mainly to train young women on IT tools.

Internet and Citizen Participation: Moroccan Youths Reinvent Their Democracy

Liviane Urquiza's picture

This week, I had the opportunity to discuss the rise of citizen participation in Morocco with Tarik Nesh-Nash. If the name means nothing to you, it’s time to discover the man behind it!

Tarik Nesh-NashTarik is 34 years old. He’s a computer engineer and is acutely aware of politics in his country. Youth, skills, and an understanding of the issues: Combine ingredients, mix well, and finish off with a generous dash of inventiveness. What you have is a young social innovator ready to revolutionize the role of citizens in his country.

Early 2011. The first buds of the Arab spring are about to bloom. The Moroccan people take to the streets to denounce social injustice, unemployment, and corruption and call for a genuine constitutional monarchy. In March, King Mohamed VI announces the launch of constitutional reforms. Several days later, Tarik launches Reforme.ma, a participatory platform he co-founded with another young computer engineer, Mehdi Slaoui Andaloussi. The platform will enable thousands of Moroccans to contribute to drafting the new constitution.

Brussels: Diving into the Heart of Development Policies

Liviane Urquiza's picture

Available in Español, Français

I just returned from Brussels where I met five very determined individuals. Whether an entrepreneur, a doctoral student, a ministerial chief of staff, or the head of a community organization in the slums of Nairobi, these five young people have one common goal: to fight for a more just future. And to achieve this goal, they have chosen to use both their talent and their determination to intensify the pace of social progress in their country.

Benedetta Mwongeli Kyengo (Kenya), Bruce Dube (South Africa), Crystal Fiallo (Dominican Republic), and María de los Ángeles Lasa and Alexis Estevez (Argentina) were guests of the World Bank at the Brussels Forum.

Click on the slideshow below for their portraits

The schedule for the trip was packed. No sooner had they been introduced than they had to set off for their first major meeting...  

HappyLife and Social Games: Solidarity goes viral!

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | Español


Stéphane Buthaud - HappyLifeLast week, I was fortunate enough to have a discussion with Stéphane Buthaud, the founder of HumanoGames, which is a video game company whose mission is to “change lives.” Mission accomplished.

Thanks to the game HappyLife, launched just one year ago, Facebook users can provide financial backing for the projects of small entrepreneurs all over the world.

This is how it works:  Each player creates his or her own micro-business in the virtual world of HappyLife and re-invests the profits to help an entrepreneur get started in business in real life.

“A Project for Solidarity on a Global Scale”

Nothing in Stéphane’s background pre-ordained him to become a creator of games for the Web.  After engineering studies and a Masters degree in International Business, he gained solid experience working for a number of NGOs on micro-finance projects; first in Bosnia, then Rwanda, China, Argentina, etc.  Until the day he decided to found his own social enterprise.

What made him decide to create a game on Facebook? “It was the best possible way to foster solidarity and rally a community without borders around a common objective.  I wanted to develop a solidarity project with a global reach, to help people who come up with projects, but who lack the means to get started,” Stéphane explains.  

Really? A game on Facebook that could help in the fight against poverty…?

Millions Of Invisible Children Are Deprived Of Their Rights

Liviane Urquiza's picture

Available in Español, Français

YouThink! Enregistrement des naissances
A mother holding her baby. Nigeria. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank.

Have you ever met an invisible child? No? Are you sure…?

When a child’s birth is not recorded in the official local or national registry, it means that he officially does not exist. Millions of children throughout the world are victims of this situation and grow up without an identity.

Pages