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Kenya

How Do You Take Your Idea from Mind to Market?

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
                  
Kate Kiguru is a mobile entreprenuer. She was at the World Bank last week to promote her app, Akida. Kate Kiguru

When Kate Kiguru was growing up in a small village in Kenya, she was brought up like a boy. It wasn’t by design.

In the Midst of the Slums, a Pool of Talent Waiting to be Tapped

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

Transforming the slums from within
Children from the Mukuru Talent Development center showcasing their creativity in the Lunga Lunga slum in Kenya.

From Bombay to Manila to the favelas in Rio, more than one billion people are estimated to be currently living in slums. According to the United Nations, this figure is expected to surpass the two billion mark by 2030.

With no roof or solid walls and no access to clean water or toilets, living conditions in the slums are unhygienic and hazardous. Considering that approximately 70% of slum dwellers are under 30, the future of the slums rests in the hands of the young generations. What do these youth need to reverse the trend and improve the daily lives of slum dwellers? 

Carbon for (clean) water in Western Kenya

Carmen Elsa Lopez Abramson's picture

Available in: Español 

An hour down a dirt road stands the most beautiful natural treasure in Kenya’s Western Province—the Kakamega Forest. The forest is a fraction of its former size, and it grows smaller every day because of the insatiable demand for firewood.

City livin'

Saadia Iqbal's picture

Maybe it's the bright lights and majestic skyscrapers. Or maybe it's theaters and shopping and cafes. Usually, though, it's just the pragmatic search for employment. Whatever the reason, big cities have lured people throughout the ages, and in many cases it really is a siren call...urban life can be tough going.

What can development learn from the information and communication technology revolution?

Siena Anstis's picture

A few months ago, I was at a dinner at Erik Hersman’s (also behind Ushahidi). His team has started a new project called iHub, basically a technology (web and mobile) incubator in a great new office building in Nairobi. Fledgling programers submit an application for membership and, if accepted, are given free & fast wireless internet and a great place to work with like-minded people.

Preserving the “authentic”? Changing lifestyles in North Eastern Kenya

Siena Anstis's picture

The pastoral lifestyle in Kenya has made headlines around the world. Faced with the worst drought in memory, 2009 has been a difficult year for communities like the North Eastern Somali Kenyans.

The extreme weather conditions that Kenya is facing—intense drought followed by torrential rains—will probably get worse. Pastoral communities need to find ways to survive beyond demeaning foreign handouts that only prolong their unreliable lifestyle without offering sustainable new options.

Twitter: Not Just a Dating Tool

Siena Anstis's picture

In Tolstoy’s novel, War and Peace, Pierre, a young noble, does some philanthropic work in the Russian wastelands. His projects complete, he is thanked profusely by the women, peasants and priests, whom he thought he had benefited. Satisfied, he returns home full of self-worth. However, it soon becomes clear that Pierre had not helped anyone. In fact—working without cultural context or experience—he has aggravated the situation.

Development, the simple way, changes girls' lives

Siena Anstis's picture

While development is riddled with complex acronyms and detailed budgets, sometimes the least intricate programs are the most effective. The Girls’ Forum is one example. Implemented by Education for Marginalized Children of Kenya (EMACK) in Kenya’s Coast and North East Province, the program has altered the lives of many young women. 

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