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Morocco

Internet and Citizen Participation: Moroccan Youths Reinvent Their Democracy

Liviane Urquiza's picture

This week, I had the opportunity to discuss the rise of citizen participation in Morocco with Tarik Nesh-Nash. If the name means nothing to you, it’s time to discover the man behind it!

Tarik Nesh-NashTarik is 34 years old. He’s a computer engineer and is acutely aware of politics in his country. Youth, skills, and an understanding of the issues: Combine ingredients, mix well, and finish off with a generous dash of inventiveness. What you have is a young social innovator ready to revolutionize the role of citizens in his country.

Early 2011. The first buds of the Arab spring are about to bloom. The Moroccan people take to the streets to denounce social injustice, unemployment, and corruption and call for a genuine constitutional monarchy. In March, King Mohamed VI announces the launch of constitutional reforms. Several days later, Tarik launches Reforme.ma, a participatory platform he co-founded with another young computer engineer, Mehdi Slaoui Andaloussi. The platform will enable thousands of Moroccans to contribute to drafting the new constitution.

Do you know where to find the world’s best quality of life?

Nahla Benslama's picture

Any guesses? You may answer right away or you may be wiser and ask: “Best quality of life depending on what…?!” After all, ranking 192 countries (almost every country in the world) based on their quality of life is not a straightforward task!

Soon in Morocco: the end of the ‘tramway’ suspense!

Nahla Benslama's picture

Morocco is about to launch the “masterpiece” it has been busy constructing over the past few years: a tramway! Oh yes, finally the Moroccan population will be able to enjoy, for the first time ever, riding a tramway to get from the capital Rabat to its neighbouring city Salé in reduced time and complete comfort.

The MENA region’s got ‘growth potential!’

Nahla Benslama's picture

According to global and regional leaders who participated in the World Economic Forum (WEF) on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in Marrakech, Morocco from 26-28 October 2010, “the MENA region has the potential to become an emerging market leader and engine of world growth.”

How close is Arab audiovisual media to youth?

Nahla Benslama's picture

More than 700 satellite TV channels broadcast programmes in the Arab world, with topics ranging from religion and art to politics and astrology. Yet, very few of them, if any, offer “real” viewing options and programs serving the needs of the largest portion of society—youth—or broadcast the issues youth is concerned with.