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Côte d’Ivoire’s Emerging Young Entrepreneurs

Jamie Lee's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Kone Gninlnagnon

Kone Gninlnagnon is a young entrepreneur who dreams of exporting rice from Côte d’Ivoire to the world.

But he knows the quality of the rice must be improved and tested in the domestic market first. Thus, a new business idea was born: helping to make homegrown rice more competitive. “We cannot win the loyalty of consumers with bad quality rice,” he says. His project, “Riz Ivoire,” would promote the rice that comes from the heart of Côte d’Ivoire and help deliver high-quality rice to Ivorian dining tables. He also wants to encourage other Ivorian youth to invest in “rizculture.”

Now Gninlnagnon is one step closer to achieving his dream. His project won third place in the Start-up Competition at ICI 2014, the Fourth Côte d‘Ivoire National Investment Forum that took place in the city of Abidjan in January. While the three-day event focused on investment opportunities in the country’s key sectors like agriculture, industry, and infrastructure, the spotlight of the closing ceremony fell on entrepreneurship and the youth of Côte d’Ivoire, as they are the drivers of future growth and innovation in the post-conflict country. Côte d’Ivoire aims to be an emerging market economy by 2020. In 2013, the country’s growth rate was 8.7%.

A Young African Entrepreneur Invests in Caterpillars to Fight Malnutrition

Anne Senges's picture
Eating shea caterpillars

While the shea tree is known for its nuts, used to produce a butter to which myriad benefits have been attributed (skin and nutritional, in particular), much less is known about the caterpillars that feed on its leaves. And this is precisely what a young man from Burkina Faso has set out to change. 

What’s the Relationship between Youth, Open Government, and Development?

Felipe Estefan's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية
Youth demand openness
Percentage of youth who said they want their government to be more open. Source: Global Opening Government Survey

We live in a time unlike any other in our history.
 
Today, many more of us have more tools to more quickly exchange more knowledge and expertise than ever before.
 

World Radio Day: Celebrating Young People

Michael Boampong's picture
Yesterday, we celebrated radio, one of the most important means of communication in our times. It is the only means of entertainment and information in some places. Recently, I (Michael Boampong aka M.B.) met with Curious Minds, a Ghana-based youth development organization, to learn about their radio show, “Gems of Our Time,” and how radio plays a role even in today’s digital age. Below is the interview with Emmanuel Ashong (E.A.), program officer of Curious Minds, edited for clarity purposes.

How Youth Saved Bananas in Uganda

Ravi Kumar's picture
Bananas

Imagine yourself living in Uganda, a landlocked country in East Africa, where more than 14 million people eat bananas almost daily. In fact, as a resident in Uganda, chances are you and everyone you know is consuming 0.7 kg of bananas per day. Citizens of no other country in the world eat more bananas than Ugandans.
 

YouThink! Year in Review

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: Français
I'm amazed by how young people around the world are innovating despite the numerous challenges they face. Their participation in the fight against poverty is crucial. At the World Bank, we know we can't end extreme poverty by 2030 without empowering youth.

World AIDS Day 2013: An Overview

Liviane Urquiza's picture
© World BankAs a symbol of its commitment to combating AIDS, the World Bank Group places the red ribbon on the facade of its headquarters in Washington.

 
Every year, December 1 serves as a reminder that despite the scientific advances made in recent years, AIDS remains pervasive across the world and continues to claim victims. Sustained commitment is critical if we wish to halt the spread of the virus and its devastating impact on poverty reduction efforts.

In a guidance document, the World Health Organization emphasizes the importance of improving access by adolescents (aged 10 to 19) to preventive services, treatment, and care. The establishment of free screening programs would provide this population segment with access to earlier treatment and limit the risk of infection by those unaware of their seropositive status.

How Do You Take Your Idea from Mind to Market?

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
                  
Kate Kiguru is a mobile entreprenuer. She was at the World Bank last week to promote her app, Akida. Kate Kiguru

When Kate Kiguru was growing up in a small village in Kenya, she was brought up like a boy. It wasn’t by design.

How to Create Jobs for Young People

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: Français | 中文 | العربية

Ask one of the millions of youth in Nairobi or New Delhi about their concerns for the future, and more than likely the response will be that he or she is worried about finding a job.

There are more than 1.2 billion young people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world. Seventy-five million of them are unemployed, according to the International Labor Organization (ILO).

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