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World Radio Day: Celebrating Young People

Michael Boampong's picture
Yesterday, we celebrated radio, one of the most important means of communication in our times. It is the only means of entertainment and information in some places. Recently, I (Michael Boampong aka M.B.) met with Curious Minds, a Ghana-based youth development organization, to learn about their radio show, “Gems of Our Time,” and how radio plays a role even in today’s digital age. Below is the interview with Emmanuel Ashong (E.A.), program officer of Curious Minds, edited for clarity purposes.

How Youth Saved Bananas in Uganda

Ravi Kumar's picture
Bananas

Imagine yourself living in Uganda, a landlocked country in East Africa, where more than 14 million people eat bananas almost daily. In fact, as a resident in Uganda, chances are you and everyone you know is consuming 0.7 kg of bananas per day. Citizens of no other country in the world eat more bananas than Ugandans.
 

Listening to 7 Billion Voices

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | 中文

What have you learned from your parents? What do you want to pass on to your children? What difficult circumstances have you been through?

How would you answer these questions?

By asking the same questions on elementary matters to thousands of people around the world, a web project has collected precious clues that we – the 7+ billion individuals currently living on Earth – have a lot more in common than we may think.

A Secure Life for Young People, at Home or Abroad

Michael Boampong's picture
Last fall, I had the honor of speaking to participants at the 13th Melaka International Youth Dialogue, which focused on youth migration. I spoke about general trends of youth migration and the increasing number of young people who move within and across countries and regions, a situation that is influencing the human development of young people either positively or negatively.

YouThink! Year in Review

Ravi Kumar's picture
Also available in: Français
I'm amazed by how young people around the world are innovating despite the numerous challenges they face. Their participation in the fight against poverty is crucial. At the World Bank, we know we can't end extreme poverty by 2030 without empowering youth.

Human Rights: In Our Hands

Viva Dadwal's picture

 A student in Brazil. Video still. © Romel Simon/World Bank

It was in Paris, 65 years ago, on Dec. 10, 1948, that the president of the United Nations General Assembly, Herbert Vere Evatt, called for a vote on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Forty-eight nations voted in favor, eight abstained, but none dissented. Thus was adopted a simple, yet powerful declaration, which set out the basic principle of equality and non-discrimination:

“All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.”
— Article 1 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Discrimination based on sexual orientation occurs on a regular basis around the world. In its worst form, it includes forms of violent persecution such as killings, rape, and torture. A quick Google search can illustrate how the world stereotypes and discriminates against queer people. The International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association’s world survey of laws on criminalization, protection, and recognition of same-sex love reports that consensual same-sex relationships remain criminalized in some 78 countries. In at least five, the legally prescribed punishment for homosexual acts is death. Today’s fight for equality is as much about changing these discriminatory laws and practices as it is about reshaping the hearts and minds of people around the world.

World AIDS Day 2013: An Overview

Liviane Urquiza's picture
© World Bank

As a symbol of its commitment to combating AIDS, the World Bank Group places the red ribbon on the facade of its headquarters in Washington.

 
Every year, December 1 serves as a reminder that despite the scientific advances made in recent years, AIDS remains pervasive across the world and continues to claim victims. Sustained commitment is critical if we wish to halt the spread of the virus and its devastating impact on poverty reduction efforts.

In a guidance document, the World Health Organization emphasizes the importance of improving access by adolescents (aged 10 to 19) to preventive services, treatment, and care. The establishment of free screening programs would provide this population segment with access to earlier treatment and limit the risk of infection by those unaware of their seropositive status.

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