Youthink! The World Bank's blog for youth
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Youth

Beyond “teaching a man how to fish…”

Saptarshi Pal's picture

My first brush with business was at the age 11, when I started selling stickers/posters in school. It was a great experience, although short-lived, and I regard it a milestone as I realized what I wanted to be when I “grow up!”

At the age of 15, I started working on environmental projects in Kolkata. This was another great experience, the summary of which can be found here, where we had to come up with revenue-generating projects to support our numerous activities.

Only 199 years ago

Maria Rodriguez's picture

Lately I have been regaining the pleasure to read. I don’t know about you, but I had to read so much in high school and college that it slowly became just a task, not something I enjoyed anymore. Thank God that’s changing! Now I am specially enjoying historic novels, chronicles and biographies of people who have achieved great impact on humankind, and personal growth books.

Local Actions, Global Benefits

Saptarshi Pal's picture

Highlights of the essay by Guillermo Recio Guajardo (Mexico) who is one of the eight finalists of The World Bank Essay Competition 2009.

Sierra Tarahumara, Mexico, is known for its enormous diversity of natural resources with over 7,000 plant species, or one fourth of all the botanical species in Mexico, that includes various species of forest resources, such as pine, fir, and ash forests.

The Importance of Not Being (too) Earnest

Saadia Iqbal's picture

The other day, someone told me Youthink! needs to be more optimistic. Well hey, it’s hard to be cheerful and witty about topics like poverty and disease…

To be fair, though, there’s often good news from the world of development. So, maybe she did have a point. I decided to try to highlight more of the positive from now on.

The End of AIDS?

Once somebody asked me why we can’t eradicate malaria by treating every person in malaria-endemic countries with an effective ant-malarial drug at the same time. As long as they all stay on the drug for as long as it takes for the current generation of infected mosquitoes to die (1-2 weeks on average, maybe a month maximum), then the human reservoir will be eliminated, no new mosquitoes will become infected, and that would be the end of malaria.

A Scattered Youth, a Scattered Response

Christine Cassar's picture

There was a time when young people were the driving force of the economy, a time when middle-aged men with graying hair felt as though the world they knew had changed beyond comprehension.

And today - Where are young people? What is youth? Who are the youth?

Ask most policy makers and they may give an age bracket and a couple of sweeping statements on vulnerability… They follow this statement with one of two descriptions– either "poor youth – jobless, insufficiently skilled," or "druggies, always up for a drink, riots and violence." The victim-perpetrator trap…

Time to Re-enlist Science (and Condoms) in the Fight against AIDS

My favorite part of Barack Obama’s inauguration speech was "We will restore science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its costs." Science and the scientific method – the process of making decisions based on observable, empirical and measurable evidence – have profoundly changed the way much of the human race (and even some of the luckier animals) live in this world.

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