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Social Development

The Importance of Good Governments for Youth Employment

Diane LuTran's picture
World Bank Group Youth Summit 2014
For more details on the World Bank Group
Youth Summit and how to apply, click here.
The role of government to address youth unemployment is crucial as they provide the "enabling environment" for youth to thrive. Governments operate as a nexus between policy and practice, and addressing the socio-economic problems impacting youth, such as unemployment and barriers to political participation is essential for youth progress and development [...]


The World Bank is providing a space to discuss these issues and more at the upcoming Youth Summit, which will be held Oct. 7 in Washington, D.C.

A Secure Life for Young People, at Home or Abroad

Michael Boampong's picture
Last fall, I had the honor of speaking to participants at the 13th Melaka International Youth Dialogue, which focused on youth migration. I spoke about general trends of youth migration and the increasing number of young people who move within and across countries and regions, a situation that is influencing the human development of young people either positively or negatively.

Human Rights: In Our Hands

Viva Dadwal's picture

 A student in Brazil. Video still. © Romel Simon/World Bank

It was in Paris, 65 years ago, on Dec. 10, 1948, that the president of the United Nations General Assembly, Herbert Vere Evatt, called for a vote on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Forty-eight nations voted in favor, eight abstained, but none dissented. Thus was adopted a simple, yet powerful declaration, which set out the basic principle of equality and non-discrimination:

“All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.”
— Article 1 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Discrimination based on sexual orientation occurs on a regular basis around the world. In its worst form, it includes forms of violent persecution such as killings, rape, and torture. A quick Google search can illustrate how the world stereotypes and discriminates against queer people. The International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association’s world survey of laws on criminalization, protection, and recognition of same-sex love reports that consensual same-sex relationships remain criminalized in some 78 countries. In at least five, the legally prescribed punishment for homosexual acts is death. Today’s fight for equality is as much about changing these discriminatory laws and practices as it is about reshaping the hearts and minds of people around the world.

In the Midst of the Slums, a Pool of Talent Waiting to be Tapped

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

Transforming the slums from within
Children from the Mukuru Talent Development center showcasing their creativity in the Lunga Lunga slum in Kenya.

From Bombay to Manila to the favelas in Rio, more than one billion people are estimated to be currently living in slums. According to the United Nations, this figure is expected to surpass the two billion mark by 2030.

With no roof or solid walls and no access to clean water or toilets, living conditions in the slums are unhygienic and hazardous. Considering that approximately 70% of slum dwellers are under 30, the future of the slums rests in the hands of the young generations. What do these youth need to reverse the trend and improve the daily lives of slum dwellers? 

Girls and Technology Can Change the World

Liviane Urquiza's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français

Young woman working on a computer.
Young woman working on a computer. Tunis, Tunisia. Photo: Arne Hoel / World Bank

“Girls programming isn’t just a cool thing; it’s also doubling the chances of developing innovative tools and making the world a better place for everyone.” These words are from my friend Julie, who has been working as a web developer for the last four years. She has also been involved in a few volunteer programs in Africa, mainly to train young women on IT tools.

The fresh and integrated approach of inclusive businesses

Maria Rodriguez's picture

Are businesses and social interest initiatives mutually exclusive? I guess for a lot of people the answer to this question would be “YES!” because they perceive that what is profitable for a company does not create any social impact besides employment generation. I am surprised how frequently I get comments like “business administrators only think about money.” You know what? They should!