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Afrique de l’Ouest : une vision commune au service d’un littoral résilient

Dahlia Lotayef's picture
Also available in: English
Au Togo, l’érosion du littoral menace les habitations et les moyens de subsistance. Crédit photo : Eric Kaglan, Banque mondiale

Au Togo, les familles placent souvent des talismans à l’extérieur de leurs maisons, face à l’océan Atlantique, espérant que leurs pouvoirs magiques ou spirituels supposés les protègeront des vagues qui pénètrent toujours plus loin dans les terres.
 
Cela n’a hélas pas sauvé ces dizaines de villages dévorés par les flots depuis le milieu des années 1990. Les coques de bateaux, remplies de souvenirs sur des côtes qui perdent chaque année jusqu’à 5 à 10 mètres de terrain, sont devenues impropres à toute activité rémunératrice. Les anciens habitants qui viennent en pèlerinage sur les lieux de leur enfance restent abasourdis en constatant que la mer a littéralement englouti des communautés entières.

West African countries commit to common vision for coastal resilience

Dahlia Lotayef's picture
Also available in: Français
Coastal erosion is threatening homes and livelihoods in Togo. Photo by: Eric Kaglan, World Bank 


Togolese families often place talismans, thought to contain magical or spiritual properties, outside their homes facing the Atlantic Ocean in hopes of protecting their dwellings from encroaching tides.
 
Unfortunately, dozens of villages have been devoured since the mid-1990s, leaving behind shells of houses, livelihoods and memories in the wake of a coast receding as much as 5-10 meters per year. When expatriates return to Togo’s coast to visit their childhood homes, they are astonished to see that communities have literally washed out to sea.

Relaunching Africa Can and Sharing Africa’s Growth

Francisco Ferreira's picture

Dear Africa Can readers, we’ve heard from many of you since our former Africa Chief Economist Shanta Devarajan left the region for a new Bank position that you want Africa Can to continue highlighting the economic challenges and amazing successes that face the continent. We agree.

Today, we are re-launching Africa Can as a forum for discussing ideas about economic policy reform in Africa as a useful, if not essential, tool in the quest to end poverty in the region.

You’ll continue to hear from many of the same bloggers who you’ve followed over the past five years, and you’ll hear from many new voices – economists working in African countries and abroad engaging in the evidence-based debate that will help shape reform. On occasion, you’ll hear from me, the new Deputy Chief Economist for the World Bank in Africa.

We invite you to continue to share your ideas and challenge ours in pursuit of development that really works to improve the lives of all people throughout Africa.

Here is my first post. I look forward to your comments.

In 1990, poverty incidence (with respect to a poverty line of $1.25) was almost exactly the same in sub-Saharan Africa and in East Asia: about 57%. Twenty years on, East Asia has shed 44 percentage points (to 13%) whereas Africa has only lost 8 points (to 49%). And this is not only about China: poverty has also fallen much faster in South Asia than in Africa.

These differences in performance are partly explained by differences in growth rates during the 1990s, when emerging Asia was already on the move, and Africa was still in the doldrums. But even in the 2000s, when Africa’s GDP growth picked up to 4.6% or thereabouts, and a number of countries in the region were amongst the fastest-growing nations in the world, still poverty fell more slowly in Africa than in other regions. Why is that?