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Can Africa’s current education policies help build the scientists of tomorrow?

Waly Wane's picture
A medical intern in the hematology department of the Hospital Militaire D’Instruction (Military Teaching Hospital) in N’Djamena, Chad, puts a blood sample into a machine for analysis. © US Army Africa

As I write these lines, I am sitting in an airplane returning from my first mission in Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo. My mission was for the education sector, and included visiting a few lower secondary public schools. As I listen to the pilot’s welcoming message, I find myself thinking about the children I met at the schools, and trying to assess the odds of their becoming pilots, engineers or scientists.

Internationally comparable learning tests pave the way for education reform in Africa

Makhtar Diop's picture
Also available in: Français



Most parents in Africa will tell you that their children’s education is the most important investment they can make. Over the past decade, great progress has been made in terms of getting children into school, with countries such as Benin, Cameroon, Rwanda and Zambia recording primary net enrollment of over 90 percent. But across the continent, primary school completion and youth literacy rates remain unacceptably low.