Syndicate content

Recent comments

  • Reply to: Higher Salaries Can Worsen Corruption   1 week 3 days ago

    Interesting reading. I agree with your view, salary raise must go in parallel with strong monitoring and enforcement institutions. Moreover what is required is to simplify the rule book for clients/citizens and make them known to general public. Citizens' oversight forums can prove helpful to both authorities and clients/citizens. As you suggest, holistic approach would be needed.

  • Reply to: Higher Salaries Can Worsen Corruption   1 week 3 days ago

    I strongly believe higher salary will reduce the corruption and it is very much applicable in rural india where lot of government employees bribe because they get very low salary and their job is for a very limited period I.e no job security and it is also applicable to urban india too.

  • Reply to: Higher Salaries Can Worsen Corruption   1 week 4 days ago

    Similar cautionary note in two public hospital studies of corruption. In Argentina (Schargrodsky), no relationship between wages and corruption (measured as higher than predicted payments for hospital supplies). In Venezuela (Jaen & Paravisini), higher wages were associated with higher corruption. Both studies published in Savedoff & Di Tella "Diagnosis Corruption" (2000). The relationship is not simple and your study is further demonstration. My simple conclusion from the hospital studies was that raising wages in a generalized situation of impunity is likely to have no effect. One hypothesis for Venezuela was that the high wages for procurement officers was actually a symptom of a corrupted system - hospital directors would give procurement officers high salaries as patronage and allow them to take kickbacks and bribes in return for a cut of the proceeds. Sad. But also a very important lesson to learn when trying to promote better corruption-reducing policies.

  • Reply to: Higher Salaries Can Worsen Corruption   1 week 4 days ago

    The opening line tells all "For economists, it is borderline redundant to say that corruption has economic origins ..."
    Corruption is a cultural trait. Economists like to think that all human activity can be explained by mathematical models. The solution to corruption is cultural not economic. Religious adherence to political correctness by the Bank and most intellectuals blocks a honest analysis of corruption. For instance, I can say that corruption is endemic in Africa, but if I say that Africans are corrupt ... well that is offensive and I would be pilloried as a racist.

    We need to be honest with ourselves and break free from PC strictures that prevent real solutions which would be considered neocolonist at best.

  • Reply to: Big vs. small firms: one size does not fit all   1 week 5 days ago

    I think that college students are missing out on a once in a lifetime opportunity to travel the world and work with foreigners and to do some missionary work. This article is correct when it talks about 3rd world countries not having the same opportunities that we have in the United States. Right now, international job employment is at a all time high and is paying top dollar for language translators, job skills teachers, and many more employment creation. At our web site Global Job Center, we have relevant material and job offers for students and for anyone seeking job employment abroad. Topics such "Traveling Abroad" and finding work are just some of the main issues. Our International Newspaper section, has immediate job employment offers from all over the world. Students, right out of college, can now travel all over the world and earn a good income while doing it. http://www.globaljobcenter.org