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Ten facts you didn’t know about women in the Arab world

Maha Abdelilah El-Swais's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Women currently make up 49.7% of around 345.5 million people in the Middle East and North Africa region. But despite the many advances made in terms of closing the gender gap in health, political representation, and labor force participation, many other barriers remain. 

To celebrate International Women’s Day, here’s a list of facts about women of the Arab world. 

Gulf women and competing economies

Dr. Amal Mohammed Al-Malki's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


‘Arab Women’ are the subject of Western and Eastern curiosity and, often, fascination. However, most attempts to investigate ‘Arab Women’ reduce them to one entity, ignoring their multitude of experience.  The fact is Arab women are very different from each other.  Just like everyone else, their realities are shaped by different personal, social, economic, religious and political factors. Arab women are the products of their diverse societies. Yet, the impact of differences on women’s lives are rarely captured or studied, much less understood. 

Women entrepreneurs thriving in Gaza’s nascent start-up community

Iliana Montauk's picture
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 Gaza Sky Geeks

It is amazing how often in crisis, new opportunities arise. Gaza is no exception. With its borders tightly controlled, the narrow strip (roughly twice the size of Washington, D.C.) is the last place one would think of looking for economic opportunities for young women. And yet, in spite of (or perhaps because of) the territory’s regional limitations, women in Gaza have an advantage when it comes to becoming leaders in technology start-ups.

Tracking hidden wealth alters view of inequality in the Middle East and North Africa

Catherine Bond's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Until now, the gap between rich and poor in the Middle East and North Africa has seemed—statistically at least—narrower than in many other regions of the world. Digging up data on wealth that has been squirreled abroad and hidden from the public eye, though, changes that. 

Can teachers unions help improve the quality of education in the Arab world?

Kamel Braham's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


In many countries in the Middle East and North Africa, and in fact around the world, teachers—who play a pivotal role in any effort to improve education quality—have not been officially represented in the design of key government programs aimed at education reform.

Can Tunisia become a hub for entrepreneurs?

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Although Tunisia has made significant political progress since its 2011 revolution, in terms of the economy, development has stalled. Tunis-based writer, Christine Petré takes the pulse of entrepreneurship in this young democracy and finds that despite obstacles many would-be entrepreneurs remain positive.  

Yemen: Too much donor aid on paper, not enough in practice

Nabil Ali Shaiban's picture
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 World Bank l Foad Al Harazi

It’s been four years since Yemen witnessed a popular revolt against corruption and injustice.  But Yemen has not stabilized since. Back in September 2012, hopes were high that Yemen was on the path to political transition. Aid by the international donor community poured in.  But today, Yemenis seem to have lost all hope in government or the impact donor aid could have to improve their prospects. 

Oil, Politics and Offshore Accounts

Catherine Bond's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Gennadiy Kolodkin / World Bank

Do political institutions limit ‘rent-seeking’ (excessive profits free from competition) by political elites? Very much so, if they’re working properly, argue the four authors (Jørgen Juel Andersen, Niels Johannesen, David Dreyer Lassen, and Elena Paltseva) of ‘Petro Rents, Political Institutions, and Hidden Wealth: Evidence from Offshore Bank Accounts.’ Their paper examines unique public data—on bank deposits held in some of the world’s best-known tax havens—to establish whether oil, in particular, really is the ‘resource curse’ it is made out to be by a range of political scientists and development professionals. (Spoiler alert—the answer is ‘yes.’) 

Avoiding a Permanent Refugee Trap in Turkey

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


This blog was originally published on Future Development.

 
There are now some 9 million Syrian refugees and it is estimated that 5,000 additional refugees are created every day. Over 5 million Syrians reside in neighboring countries, principally Jordan (800,000), Lebanon (1.8 million) and Turkey (1.8 million). Europe and the West have been largely closed to these refugees with desperate boat journeys the stuff of daily news items. The crisis is not abating, and with 2 million refugees in Iraq the problem is expanding. What is clear is that many of these refugees are unlikely to be going home soon, if ever.

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