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Smuggling Adds to Tunisia's Budget Woes

Gael Raballand's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

This blog post was first published on the Trade Post blog by Gael Raballand and Miles McKenna.

A big issue for the business community, informal trade has been equally as troublesome for the cash-strapped transitional government. According to recent World Bank research, the Tunisian government is losing a significant amount of public revenues-- duties, value-added tax and other taxes-- from informal trade along the Libyan and Algerian borders.

Tracking Tunisia's stolen assets: the balance sheet three years on

Jean Pierre Brun's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

This blog was first published on StAR's website by Jean-Pierre Brun.

On January 14, 2011, Tunisia’s President Zine El Abbedine Ben Ali fled to Saudi Arabia in the wake of a popular uprising against his 24 year-long rule. Ben Ali was the first head of State to fall in the Arab Spring – the outpouring of discontent against long standing autocracies in the region. Following his forced departure, the interim Tunisian government charged the former President with money laundering and drugs trafficking, and sent out international requests to obtain his arrest and the freezing of assets he allegedly stole. In 2011, Ben Ali was sentenced in absentia to life imprisonment for inciting violence and murder and also convicted (along with his wife) of wide scale theft.

The voices of the people: street art in MENA, a visual guide

Simon Bell's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

Simon Bell

After decades of suppressed voice, an inability to say what one thought, to protest, to offer a contrary point of view or dissent – the Arab world is at last unshackled to say exactly what it wants and wherever it wants. Nowhere is this more true than on the streets of the Arab capitals where an explosion of graffiti is voicing the views of the people in both words and pictures.

Can the Arab Awakening change an entrenched culture of nepotism?

Yasser El-Gammal's picture
Also available in: العربية

                     Kim Eun Yeul

The question of nepotism is in the minds of many people in the Arab world. Some are hopeful that change can be brought by the Arab Spring, but others are doubtful. In a series of blogs, I plan to look into some of the ways nepotism, favoritism and other ills have become ingrained in Arab society.

Tunisia's cash back: the start of more to come?

Guest Blogger's picture
Also available in: العربية
        Credit: European Parliament, Flickr Creative Commons

This is good day for asset recovery. First and foremost it is a victory for the Tunisian people and the Tunisian government. It demonstrates that the consistent and patient efforts undertaken by the authorities in Tunis, including the Tunisian Financial Intelligence Unit, the Committee for the return of Stolen Assets, and the Ministry of Justice, are now paying off.

Profile: The audacity to dream big in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

                              Photo Source: Yoann Cimier | www.yoanncimier.com

“If we are able to say that a poor, majority Muslim, and conservative society is capable of making a democracy of international standard, other countries in the region will have no excuse not to follow us,” says Amira Yahyaoui. “But Tunisia won’t succeed unless we continue to be bold. We must be audacious in our ambitions.”

Yemen at the midpoint to its new future

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية
        World Bank | Scott Wallace

This month marks the midpoint of the transition process in Yemen. As agreed upon in the peace initiative in November 2011, the transition will include a national dialogue that brings together a broad geographic and political cross section of the country, the drafting of a new constitution, and concluding with new parliamentary and presidential elections.

Two years on, a wake-up call for Tunisia

Heba Elgazzar's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank

January 14 marks two years to the day since the Tunisian uprising of 2011 and on the outside, things are moving in the right direction. Democratic elections, the drafting of a new constitution and new-found freedoms are examples that change has come. But within Tunisia, there is growing skepticism that the demands of the revolution have not been met.

Business regulations in Lebanon: where are we? where do we go now?

Jamal Ibrahim Haidar_2's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
                      World Bank | Emad Abd El Hady

During my time in Lebanon last summer, I convinced a close friend, Maroun, to start a small manufacturing firm for producing soap and shampoo. Eventually, he got the business off the ground, but there is no such thing as a free lunch. I witnessed the pain that Maroun had to go through to formally register and set up his business.

Winning voices from the Arab Revolutions

Omer Karasapan's picture
        Kim Eun Yeul

Three of the six books to receive the 2013 English PEN Award for outstanding writing in translation are by Arab authors. This award goes to works of fiction, non-fiction and poetry supporting inter-cultural understanding and freedom of expression. These are the three: The Silence and the Roar by Syria's Nihad Sirees; Writing Revolution: The Voices from Tunis to Damascus edited by Lebanon's Leyla Al-Zubaidi, and Matthew Cassel and Nemonie Craven Roderick; and Horses of God by Morocco's Mahi Binebine.

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