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Middle East and North Africa

Back to the beginning: What I learned about early childhood development in the Arab World

Angelena Simms's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Egyptian Studio l World Bank

This year, I was given the incredible opportunity of a summer internship at the headquarters of the World Bank Group in Washington, DC, researching the different levels of investment that countries in the Middle East and North African (MENA) have made in Early Childhood Development (ECD). As a result, I gained insights into development issues I would not otherwise have been aware of, nor would I have had any idea of how to go about making improvements.

Finding opportunities in Upper Egypt’s underdeveloped regions

Axel Baeumler's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Upper Egypt - Emad Abd El Hady l World Bank

Two-thirds of Egypt’s poor—about 12 million people—live in Upper Egypt, where the level of economic development lags significantly behind other regions in the country. But finding solutions to kick start private sector growth in lagging regions like these can be an intractable challenge.

How best can we support Egypt’s next generation back at school?

Amira Kazem's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Emad Abd El Hady/ World Bank

Back to school—back to the twin feelings of hope and fear. As the new school year begins, it brings hope for a better future for our children, and fears over what schools really offer them in terms of learning. Current statistics indicate that 50% of students with five years of schooling in Egypt cannot read or write, and 40% cannot do simple mathematics.

Preparing for the Future: Coordinating Syrian refugees and the diaspora

John Speakman's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Refugees from Syria - Jazzmany / Shutterstock.com

I have been looking for possible sources of investment and possible markets that would help both Syrian refugees and their host communities, and, as someone who has worked on the subject of the private sector for two decades now, one of my first questions is—“what role can the diaspora play?”

Q & A: New initiatives for education in the Middle East and North Africa, including for refugees

Safaa El-Kogali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Egyptian Studio | Shutterstock.com

In Part II of her interview, Safaa El Tayeb El-Kogali, World Bank Practice Manager for Education, explains the initiatives being take to improve all levels of public education in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and how important it is for children to be able to go to school, especially when their countries are affected by conflict.

Q & A: The importance of early childhood development in the Middle East and North Africa

Safaa El-Kogali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Egyptian Studio / Shutterstock.com

With the school year starting in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), millions of children are busily preparing to resume their studies. Some, caught in conflict, may not be able to go to school at all; others may be joining schools in countries neighboring their own. At peace or in war, throughout MENA more emphasis is being placed on early education and care. World Bank Practice Manager for Education, Safaa El Tayeb El-Kogali, co-authored a study on Early Childhood Development (ECD) in 2015, which found that, with a few exceptions, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) was faring poorly.

Tunisia: Do local governments hold the key to a new social contract?

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


It’s a simple drain, made of tiles, running down the middle of the street. There is nothing especially dramatic about the drain, but looks can be deceiving. It is in fact a sign of the changing relationship between local municipalities in Tunisia and their residents.

Arab world start-ups need partners, pathways, and talent to access markets

Jamil Wyne's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 dotshock | Shutterstock

Market access is critical to the growth of start-ups in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Start-ups seeking to scale up their operations need to think in terms of regional, rather than solely national, growth strategies from day one. However, maneuvering themselves into new countries is a complex process, and one that hinges on finding the pathways, people, and partners for market expansion.

Qat trade in Yemen: flourishing despite a falling economy

Ebrahim Al-Harazi's picture
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 Oleg Znamenskiy l Shutterstock.com

It's been fifteen months since war started in Yemen and when I look at the painful reality that more than 21 million Yemenis are in dire need of humanitarian assistance, and more than half the population faces severe food insecurity - besides the millions out of work and countless more displaced - I wonder how it can be that the demand for Qat remains so high. 

A bike ride can be much more than recreation: Cycling4Gaza

Suzan Ghazi El-Loulou's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
One of the Cycling4Gaza Tours in Washington, DC
 
We tend to think of cycling as a recreational form of sports; that a bike might take us to a specific destination – a location that we intentionally select, but it might even go beyond that tangible realm…It might touch the lives of others… We rarely think of it as a philanthropic hobby that can altruistically create opportunities for underprivileged children and ameliorate their living conditions. Cycling4Gaza is a non-profit initiative lead by a group of keen individuals who fundraise annually for Palestinian children.

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