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Middle East and North Africa

The Global Environment Facility and its Multiple Impacts

Suiko Yoshijima's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 © Dana Smillie / World Bank

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is an independent funding mechanism with its own review and approval process.  It partners with a number of institutions, including the World Bank, to prepare, supervise and implement its grants to developing countries.

Djibouti Invests in the First 1,000 Days

Homa-Zahra Fotouhi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
  Aude Guerrucci

When I visited one of the World Bank’s community sites for its new Social Safety Net program, I wanted to see the progress it had made since my first visit in November 2012.  In the first group session, I sat down with about 15 pregnant women—many of them pregnant for the first time—to hear a trained “role model mother” talk to them about the importance of rest, healthy eating, and breastfeeding. 

Time is Money, especially on Cairo’s Streets

Hartwig Schafer's picture
Also available in: العربية
 Om Prakash Agarwal

When I told friends and colleagues that my new job would be based in Cairo, almost everyone mentioned the awful congestion in the city, and how I would be wasting a tremendous amount of time being stuck in traffic. And how right they were: When it comes to traffic, Cairo is one of the most congested cities in the world. Of course, the city’s residents already know congestion is one of the city’s biggest problems. What they probably don’t know is exactly how much it’s costing them.

Young Egyptians still Waiting for Economic Opportunities

Raghada Abdel Hamed's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 World Bank l Kim Eun Yeul

Education and employment are key problems for young people in Egypt, who say they need to see changes—in terms of more jobs and better education—in the present, not in the distant “future”, the word they always hear used in promises of change in Egypt.

Voices from Yemeni Civil Society

Web Team's picture
Also available in: العربية
Civil society organizations in Yemen are among the most vibrant and dynamic in the Middle East and North Africa region. International experience has shown that they have a vital role to play in meeting the complex development challenges facing the country. One of the first steps is building a working partnership with the government. This selection of civil society voices outlines their approach to building that partnerships and meeting the challenges ahead.

President of the organization Fardos to empower women, Sameera Nasr Abdullah, addresses the value of having a space in which to build channels of communication with the government.
Sameera Nasr Abdullah

How can public procurement improve business opportunities for MENA SMEs?

Rachel Lipson's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) are becoming more of a priority for policymakers in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Seen as the driving force of many MENA economies, they help stimulate economic growth and encourage innovation and competition. They also play a huge role in creating more jobs in countries where these are urgently needed.

The Case for Regional Integration in the Middle East and North Africa

Aisha Irene Agily's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


As the job market in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region becomes increasingly global and competitive, young people with varying degrees of training and education find themselves struggling to find work. With half its population of 355 million under the age of 25, MENA has the second youngest regional population in the world after sub-Saharan Africa. If this social, economic, and academic malaise continues, a high proportion of the MENA region’s youth will be unable to leave home, get married, and develop independent lives. 

Building on Yemen’s ancient legacy of female empowerment: How legal reform can help

Tazeen Hasan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Mohammed Al-Emad

Legend has it that the Queen of Sheba came from Yemen, and although Ethiopia also stakes its claim to her, no one questions the fact that Yemen has had a number of indomitable queens in the past—something exceptional for its time. Today, Yemen has become exceptional in other ways: It ranks last, or near last, in global indices of gender gaps and female empowerment; it is one of the few countries in the world where there is no minimum age for marriage; and it has legal restrictions that impede women’s mobility and decision-making, their participation in society and their economic opportunities.

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