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Middle East and North Africa

Are fast-track quotas necessary and sufficient for gender equality in the Middle East & North Africa?

Nina Bhatt's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        Dana Smilie

As I write from Sana’a, I am thinking “ten percent is not enough.” Few would disagree that more women should be represented in legislatures across the Middle East and North Africa. Yet the best ways to achieve improved outcomes is still being debated.

Yemen at the midpoint to its new future

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية
        World Bank | Scott Wallace

This month marks the midpoint of the transition process in Yemen. As agreed upon in the peace initiative in November 2011, the transition will include a national dialogue that brings together a broad geographic and political cross section of the country, the drafting of a new constitution, and concluding with new parliamentary and presidential elections.

No problem too big: Cairo traffic meets Egyptian innovation

Hartwig Schafer's picture
Also available in: العربية
        CDG Cairo

The World Bank, together with the ministries of Communications and Transport and Egypt’s information technology industry, just organized the first ever Cairo Transport App Challenge (Cairo TApp). Teams of digital innovators tackled a range of issues related to moving about the Egyptian capitol’s congested streets.

Ensuring governance reform in Morocco is not “lost in transition”

Fabian Seiderer's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

A democratic and social transition is underway in Morocco following popular demonstrations inspired by the regional “Arab Spring,” calling for more democracy, inclusion and shared prosperity. A central feature of the transition will be the strengthening of Morocco’s governance framework, and it has so far led to the revision of the constitution and to new elections.

Is there an answer to our energy needs blowing in the wind?

Tracy Hart's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
      World Bank

When I was a graduate student, I often drove through the Altamont Pass wind farm. I thought of them as the California’s equivalent of Dutch windmills, more beauty than function. Little did I know that it was one of the first, and largest, wind farms in the United States and that I would someday learn more about their value and potential.

Fighting poverty in the Arab world: with Soap Operas?

Amina Semlali's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        Photo Source: Nasib Albitar

If you think you are immune to the lure of a soap opera then try watching an Egyptian soap. At first, you will be amused and perhaps even laugh at all the melodrama, but in the end you will most certainly find yourself wondering: Will Alia expose her evil twin sister? Will Omar learn how to read, propose to his beloved and be accepted by her upper-class family?

Unlocking the potential of young micro-entrepreneurs in Morocco

Gloria La Cava's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

With the limited prospects of a formal job, a growing number of young people, especially the less educated ones, are attracted to the prospects of self-employment. It is seen as a way out of inactivity, low pay, long working hours, and the hazardous work conditions often associated with the informal sector. But their lack of access to business training and finance constitute major barriers towards setting up viable micro-enterprises.

It is time for the Arab world to invest in people not subsidies

Hana Brixi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank

Governments in the Arab world have historically relied on subsidies to lower the cost of fuel and food as the principal means for protecting the poor and sharing wealth. Or so they claim. The fundamental problem with subsidies is that they benefit the rich far more than the poor. They are as expensive as they are inefficient, failing to deliver any economic or social value equal to the money spent on them.

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