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Conflict

The impact of Libyan middle-class refugees in Tunisia

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Libyan Flag

The Arab world is in the midst of one of the largest human displacements in modern history, with 14-15 million refugees and internally displaced people (IDPs). This number includes over 10 million Syrians that are now refugees abroad or IDPs, nearly 2 million Iraqi IDPs, and hundreds of thousands of Iraqi refugees most of whom fled to Syria. There are 2 million Libyans abroad, mostly in Tunisia, and 400,000 IDPs within the country. The region is also prone to sudden population movements such as the hurried return of hundreds of thousands of Egyptians from Libya, first when fighting intensified over the summer and then following the barbaric beheading of 21 Egyptians. 

This blog originally appeared in Future Development.

Yemen: Too much donor aid on paper, not enough in practice

Nabil Ali Shaiban's picture
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 World Bank l Foad Al Harazi

It’s been four years since Yemen witnessed a popular revolt against corruption and injustice.  But Yemen has not stabilized since. Back in September 2012, hopes were high that Yemen was on the path to political transition. Aid by the international donor community poured in.  But today, Yemenis seem to have lost all hope in government or the impact donor aid could have to improve their prospects. 

Avoiding a Permanent Refugee Trap in Turkey

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


This blog was originally published on Future Development.

 
There are now some 9 million Syrian refugees and it is estimated that 5,000 additional refugees are created every day. Over 5 million Syrians reside in neighboring countries, principally Jordan (800,000), Lebanon (1.8 million) and Turkey (1.8 million). Europe and the West have been largely closed to these refugees with desperate boat journeys the stuff of daily news items. The crisis is not abating, and with 2 million refugees in Iraq the problem is expanding. What is clear is that many of these refugees are unlikely to be going home soon, if ever.

Distributing development aid in Yemen: a mission in difficult times

Amat Al Alim Alsoswa's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

In December 2013, Yemen set-up an office to co-ordinate its use of development aid. Amatalim Al Soswa, one of the few women in Yemeni public life, was chosen to head the office, which is known as the Executive Bureau. Now, almost a year later, she reflects on the frustrations her Bureau has encountered, and on the progress she is making at this time of enormous political uncertainty in her country. 

More money needed to help Lebanon educate Syrian refugees and vulnerable students

Noah Yarrow's picture
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 Noah Yarrow
 
The teacher held up an index card, asking the students to identify the letter and its sound. Hands shot into the air as the teacher skillfully guided their recognition of the way the letter looked at the beginning, middle and end of a word, a particular characteristic of written Arabic. 

Yemen: What Next after the Friends of Yemen Meeting

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية


I have just returned from London where I attended the seventh meeting of the Friends of Yemen (FoY) group. This group was created in 2010 to help support Yemen through a period of crisis. It is co-chaired by the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia and Yemen itself, with 36 other members, including the United States and Russia.
At the meeting, members discussed how the international community would support Yemen to complete its political transition toward federalism, implement the outcome of its national dialogue—and lay the foundations for a democratic modern civil state.

Stimulating the conversation on Syria: From art to action?

Catherine Bond's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Fatigue, Bloodshed and Turmoil: Syrians Speak Through Art

If images spark conversation, can a conversation spur action? Or more specifically, can a discussion about art and Syria’s economy the more than 100 prompt finance ministers attending the World Bank’s annual Spring Meetings in Washington to dig deeper into their pockets and give more humanitarian aid to Syria?

What will happen to the Middle East and North Africa region if the Ukraine crisis escalates?

Lili Mottaghi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Arne Hoel

Following Russia’s annexation of Crimea after the popular voting in early March, the European Union and recently the U.S. and Canada have imposed their first round of sanctions—an asset freeze and travel ban on some officials in Russia and Crimea. This week NATO's foreign ministers, warning that Russian troops could invade the eastern part of Ukraine swiftly, ordered an end to civilian and military cooperation with Russia. Should the crisis escalate, potential fallout on Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries is likely. The effects would be transmitted directly through trade and indirectly through commodity prices.

Syrian Crisis: Seeing Conflict Through Art

Web Team's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


After 3 years of war, themes of fragmentation, fatigue, and bloodshed all come across in the work of Syrian artists currently being exhibited at the World Bank.

Collectively, their paintings convey a sense of the internal turmoil caused by external violence, paintings that hint at conflict: the skeleton beneath the skin, a fractured womb, being caught in a trap like a fly, the scarlet gashes of torn flesh, and sinister handcuffs, to name a few subjects.

Join us April 9th, 2014, for the opening of the art exhibition featuring 35 paintings by 15 Syrian artists who were given the time and space to work at an artist residence in Lebanon.
Get a glimpse of the paintings here.

In Lebanon, Time and Space for Syrian Artists to Paint

Raghad Mardini's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Art Residence in Aley, Lebanon

After the situation in Syria deteriorated, around October 2011, thousands of Syrians fled to Lebanon, among them many young emerging artists. With the difficult conditions and emotional trauma, artists had to take jobs in construction and in restaurants instead of creating art. Given the situation and my belief in the importance of art in hard times, the idea of an artists’ residence in the town of Aley, or the Art Residence in Aley (ARA), arose.

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