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My young children give me hope

Ahmad Owda's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Majdi Al-Najjar l World Bank

With the start of the new school year, my children are eager to get back into their classrooms, like all students after a long summer vacation. Perhaps, they feel as they grow and advance to the next level that their dreams are getting closer.  

Piles of garbage, blackouts, water shortages welcome students back to school

Dima Krayem's picture
Also available in: العربية
John Donelly / World Bank

A dismal garbage disposal crisis, long, unregulated power cuts and water shortages, coupled with deepening financial hardship, have exposed a ruling political class as being too busy squabbling in their own, narrow self-interest to worry about the pressing needs of Lebanon’s other citizens. In despair, citizens have taken to the streets in protests to demand their basic rights—a myriad of social, political and financial suffering, topped by mounds of garbage. The protests have all but overshadowed another imminent crisis as the end of September’s “back to school” season looms, and the impact of about 1.5 million refugees—a third of them children and adolescents—poses yet another challenge.

Education in Egypt needs permanent solutions, not “band-aids”

Amira Kazem's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

“Is this meant to be a band-aid?” one participant intervened. This intriguing comment, made during consultations held in Cairo on an education initiative by the World Bank Group and Islamic Development Bank, describes what many people think about past interventions in Egypt’s education system.

What is a university degree worth in the Arab world?

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Ramzi Maalouf

Graduation—a long-awaited day in most students' lives. Yet, according to Amir Fakih, himself a recent graduate from Lebanon’s Notre Dame University, a graduation ceremony also comes with grievances. To illustrate his perception of the future for Lebanon’s young university graduates, he decided to dress himself in his graduation gown doing low-income jobs. 

Early childhood education is not a luxury

Kamel Braham's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Arne Hoel l World Bank

Observers of the educational landscape in the Maghreb countries are often left with the impression that early childhood education is more a luxury than a necessity. While child-care centers, kindergartens, and other preschool institutions are thriving in the big cities, backed by a private sector that is filling the void left by the public education system, the public preschool system continues to be neglected. In order to understand the importance of early childhood education, the status of universal education in the region needs to be examined a little more closely.

Do global rankings tell the whole truth about universities in the Arab world?

Simon Thacker's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Zurijeta l

Choosing a college or university is one of life’s pivotal decisions—it can influence your career and future opportunities. For students in the Middle East and North Africa, as elsewhere, that decision depends on many factors, large and small. But in today’s world that choice is increasingly influenced by rankings, that is, how an institution lines up against other universities when it’s rated. 

It is time to restore public education in Jordan

Dr. Musa Shteiwi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Rawan Ds’as

The results of the public secondary school examination for 2015 show that in 338 schools throughout the country not a single student passed, which an increase of 13 schools compared to last year’s results. This was a big shock for those who are interested in education in Jordan, not only because of the number of schools involved, but more importantly because it reveals a major problem in the educational system.

Who will help Syria’s displaced university students?

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
UNHCR / A. McConnell / March 2014

Pre-war, 93% of Syria’s children attended schools and some 25% of eligible youth attended tertiary institutions. But well over half of Syria’s youth in higher education are estimated to be displaced, unable to pursue their education due to insecurity or because their university facilities have been destroyed and their faculty scattered. 

I have a dream … to go back to school

Aryam Talal Al-Mofti's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

I still remember that day, Thursday, March 26, 2015, when it was announced that my school, along with all the other schools in Yemen, was being closed because of the armed conflict and war. This news was a shock to me, as it meant I would no longer have any way to relieve the pressures of living in a country that lacks even the basic necessities of life.

Twelve reasons why the Arab world needs to pay more attention to early childhood development

Will Stebbins's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

Inequality begins early in life. In the Middle East and North Africa region it begins before birth, as prenatal care is not universal, and continues right through early childhood with different levels of access to vital nutrition, health services and early education. Missing out on any one of these key development factors can leave a child at a permanent disadvantage in school and adult life. There is also the risk that inequality entrenched early in life is passed on to the next generation, creating a cycle of poverty. A new World Bank report has calculated the different chances that a child from the region’s poorest 20% of households (least advantaged child) and  a child from the region’s richest 20% of households (most advantaged child) have for healthy development.