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Environment

#YouStink: The environmental youth movement in Lebanon

Christine Petré's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Shutterstock/ Nattapol Sritongcom

On July 17 the Naameh landfill in southern Beirut, which was overflowing with garbage from the Mount Lebanon region and the capital Beirut, closed due to pressure from the local population living around the site. However, without any clear alternative, the trash started to pile up on the streets of Beirut and beyond.

A green school in Egypt offers lessons on coping with climate change

Mohamed Ashraf Abdel Samad's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
The Shagara project

The Middle East is plagued by so many issues—severe economic problems, civil wars, and the threat of radical armed groups—that it is easy to push climate change to the bottom of everyone’s agenda. But the magnitude of the challenges brought about by man-made global warming to the Middle East and North Africa region could reverse this. 

#EarthDay: Floods, droughts and extreme heat threaten the Arab World

Maria Sarraf's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Postcard

If the earth gets much hotter this century, life will get harder for most people across the world. But how much harder will it be for people in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), a region already known for its heat and aridity? For many, climate change evokes thoughts of bitterly cold winters, burning hot summers, long droughts, and spectacular floods. But for MENA, climate change will also mean the loss of traditional incomes, forced migration and a constant struggle to make ends meet. Earth Day is a moment to examine the link between the impact of climate change on nature and humankind.

By the numbers: Facts about water crisis in the Arab World

Ghanimah Al-Otaibi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


The Middle East and North Africa is home to 6% of the world’s population and less than 2% of the world’s renewable water supply. In fact, it is the world’s driest region with 12 of the world’s most water scarce countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Kuwait, Jordan, Libya, Oman, the Palestinian Territories, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

Smart Cities in North Africa: A Localized Debate about a Global Trend

Mehrunisa Qayyum's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel l World Bank

Walking past the Check-in counter in Casablanca’s Mohamed V International Airport, a digital sign claims X amount of solar energy used and X amount of energy savings occurred in powering a transit hub with the use of polycrystalline panel technology.  As a tourist, this may come as a pleasant surprise if she has not yet had the opportunity to see other improvements, like Rabat’s tram system.  As a citizen, this may be inspiring as the term “smart city” hints at better infrastructure and technology use.  However, what qualifies a city as a “smart city” is more often a topic for discussion only among Maghreb countries and not implementation.  

The Global Environment Facility and its Multiple Impacts

Suiko Yoshijima's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 © Dana Smillie / World Bank

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is an independent funding mechanism with its own review and approval process.  It partners with a number of institutions, including the World Bank, to prepare, supervise and implement its grants to developing countries.

Morocco: Turning a Commitment to Clean Energy into Reality

Fanny Missfeldt-Ringius's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
In 2009, Morocco adopted a visionary energy sector development plan that committed to increasing the country’s share of renewable energy to 42 percent of national capacity by 2020.  The country emphasized that implementing a climate change mitigation policy through introduction of clean energy technologies would contribute to the country’s economic development. At the same time, keenly concerned about its energy security and dependence on imported energy, Morocco also sees this approach also as means to changing the reality of being the Middle East’s largest energy importer.

More crop per drop in the Middle East and North Africa

Inger Andersen's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Interview
Water is a scarce commodity: we should take care of it.

In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region there is really very little choice. The region only receives about two percent of the world’s annual precipitation and holds about 1.2 percent of the world’s renewable water resources. This makes water a deeply precious and scarce resource.  The statistics are stark: The amount of water consumed in the United States averages 2,800 cubic meters per person per year, whereas in Yemen, it is 100 cubic meters per person. 
 

Among Almond Blossoms and Olive Groves on the Abraham Path: How Hiking in Palestine Creates Jobs for Women and Youth

Stefanie Ridenour's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Among Almond Blossoms and Olive Groves on the Abraham Path

Among the olive groves, almond blossoms, lush grass, and views of small towns nestled on hilltops and in valleys, World Bank colleagues and I hiked a trail in northern Palestine. Ducking into cool, dark, ancient aqueducts used by civilizations centuries ago, we paused for tea brewed by our local guide in a kettle over an open flame. A homemade meal by a local family topped off our trek. 

Natural disasters in the Arab World: Today’s plan is a shelter for tomorrow’s storm

Franck Bousquet's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        Kim Eun Yeul

Disaster Risk Management has become a critical component of national policy and planning. In the Middle East and North Africa region, the interplay of natural disasters, together with the impacts of climate change, water scarcity, and urbanization, have emerged as serious challenges for policymaker. While the number of natural disasters around the world has almost doubled since the 1980s, in MENA, the number has almost tripled. 

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