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Financial Sector

Education for education’s sake? The conundrum facing Palestinian youth

Aziz Atamanov's picture
Also available in: العربية

When it comes to education and human development, the Palestinian territories have traditionally outperformed countries with similar GNI per capita as well as its neighbors in the Middle East and North Africa region (figures 1 and 2). Despite facing one of the highest unemployment rates in the world and a severe lack of employment opportunities in the private sector, until 2010, Palestinian youth continued to invest in education.

Equipped with more education than any previous generation, young Palestinians are now moving into adulthood with uncertainty about what their futures might hold amidst a protracted risk of conflict and an economy with steadily rising unemployment.

The jobs crisis in Palestine needs an innovative response

Ceyla Pazarbasioglu's picture
Also available in: العربية
 Ahed Izhiman

Landing a job after college can be difficult anywhere, but it is especially hard in conflict-affected economies, such as Palestine. Joblessness and job insecurity are an unfortunate reality for too many young Palestinians.

Developing venture capital for young startup firms in Morocco

Randa Akeel's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


Businesses, for many the real drivers of job creation, can also be the foundation of wealth and greater economic inclusion of the general population. Jobs or Privileges, a World Bank Group report published in 2014, shows that high-growth startups—or young firms—accounted for all net job creation in Morocco’s manufacturing sector at the time. But, by comparison with older small or medium–size enterprises, young start-ups faced far greater barriers in Morocco to accessing finance.

Microfinance needed in Iraq more urgently now than ever

Nadine Chehade's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Najaf, Iraq - Shutterstock l photo story

How can development practitioners promote economic development for parts of the Arab world affected by conflict and fragility? The Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP) has featured various solutions in a recent blog series on financial inclusion during crises. These blogs highlight the fact that although conflict, violence, and uncertainty make development difficult, solid financial infrastructure for small-scale lending can help people weather a crisis or, in other words, support their economic resilience.

Tunisia Presents its Open Budget Project: MIZANIATOUNA (Our Budget)

Aicha Karafi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


The Tunisian revolution has spawned a butterfly effect, very specific to its context. On the ground, events have continued to evolve, contributing to a revolution within the Tunisian administration. As a result, the foundation has now been laid for an open, transparent, and inclusive government. 

Stock market tensions and the impact on the GCC

Jaime de Piniés Bianchi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 Fedor Selivanov l Shutterstock.com

The slowdown in China and the weak recovery in Europe and the United States has also impacted Commodity markets.  Oil prices, however, had held firm until the decision of Saudi Arabia in mid-2014 to support its market share rather than prices.

Transitional Justice in Tunisia Expanded to Include Economic Crimes

Amine Ghali's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
Tunis

More than three years after the wave of revolutions that swept some countries of the Arab region, it is now possible to step back and make an initial assessment of the subsequent transformation processes. While the picture seems bleak overall, the prospects for Tunisia’s democratic transition, at the very least, offers some cause for hope. Among the many features of the Tunisian transition, one of the most significant is the country’s commitment to a process of a transitional justice (TJ). The process took three years to materialize, and required a joint effort on the part of many actors, ranging from national organizations to the international community, along with politicians and legal professionals.

The Algeria That Wins

Emmanuel Noubissie Ngankam's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


His achievements may have attracted less attention than the brilliant performance of the Fennecs (“desert foxes”)—the Algerian football team which made it into the round of sixteen at the World Cup in Brazil—but they deserve to be revisited nonetheless. His accomplishments are not included in the records’ book, nor can they be reduced to an act of revenge against France, Algeria’s former colonizer: they are about the kind of success that only globalization holds the key to. 

Growing the Green Capital Markets in Dubai

Michael Bennett's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Theodore Scott
Source: Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, the Dubai Supreme Council of Energy (DSCE) and the World Bank agreed to design a funding strategy for a green investment program in Dubai that would look at financing green investments through a variety of sources, including green bonds and sukuk (Islamic certificates). 

Why Private Sector Development is Crucial for Morocco

Joumana Cobein's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

Like many economies in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, Morocco’s depends on the public sector, but with its economy expected to grow by only about 3 percent in 2014—having slipped from about 5 percent in 2011—it is clear that the public sector needs all the help it can get. The best way to help the public sector is to grow the private sector, and the International Finance Corporation believes the best way to grow the private sector is to provide advisory services and comprehensive investment solutions to attract foreign money, help local businesses help themselves, and create those desperately needed jobs. 

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