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Governance

The DIQA initiative: Supporting the silent data revolution in the Arab world

Sebastian Trenner's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

DIQA - Photo: Arne Hoel/World Bank

Statistical agencies in the Middle East and North Africa have now started to open up access to their raw datasets (micro-data). In a break with their old ways, they have begun either to post them on their websites or to share them on a bilateral basis. To support this wind of change, a group of donors active in the statistical domain and avant-garde partner countries joined forces for the first time to launch the Data Improvement and Quality in Access initiative (DIQA – which reads as “precision” in Arabic).

Accountability for Public Services: Do You See a Solution?

Hana Brixi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

Accountability for Public Services: Do You See a Solution? - Photo: Arne Hoel

“Kefaya!”

“Kefaya!” (“Enough!” in Arabic), was one of the main slogans in 2011 as people took to the streets and called for social justice.  Although change has taken various forms across the region, the quest for social justice remains prevalent throughout.

One of the key ways to promote social justice is through better public services. As surveys suggest, social justice for citizens largely means equal access to quality public services such as healthcare and education.

Egypt: Subsidy reform and social safety nets are 2 sides of same coin

Guest Blogger's picture

Egypt: Subsidy reform and social safety nets are 2 sides of same coin - Photo: Emad Abd El Hady

Egyptian writer and commentator Bassem Sabry talks to Hartwig Schafer, World Bank Director for Djibouti, Egypt and Yemen about the economic challenges facing Cairo.

Sabry: What do you think are the questions that are missing from the discussion on Egypt right now?

Schafer: I think the question is, what is the priority right now for Egypt? If we go back two and a half years, the revolution was basically the result of growing exclusion and inequality. And that is still, in my view, the top priority.

The Possibility of Social Inclusion: Yemen's National Dialogue

Junaid Kamal Ahmad's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

The Possibility of Social Inclusion: Yemen's National Dialogue

This Blog was originally posted on the World Bank Voices Blog
The National Dialogue is an important moment in Yemen’s rich history.  It has brought together political parties, social groups, women, youth, and regional representation around a dialogue to craft the future of Yemen.


Mainstreaming Citizen Engagement in the Middle East and North Africa Region

Franck Bousquet's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

Mainstreaming Citizen Engagement in Middle East and North Africa Region

Citizen Engagement (CE) is a means to empower citizens and enable them to participate—constructively and effectively—in public decisions. Since January 2011, citizens in the Middle East and North Africa Region (MENA) have asserted their rights for a more inclusive state – a state willing to broker a new social contract that better reflects the aspirations of ordinary citizens who seek equitable progress.

Video: Why is the World Bank in Libya?

Marouane El Abassi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

From the World Bank office in Tripoli, Representative Marouane El Abassi outlines his commitment to helping Libya build a new state, with a strategy that ensures the right skills and expertise are delivered at the right time.

Growth slowdown in five MENA countries extends into 2013

Lili Mottaghi's picture
Also available in: العربية
        World Bank

This week’s mass demonstrations in Egypt and assassination of an opposition leader in Tunisia -- not to mention the continuing conflict in Syria -- highlight the turmoil and uncertainty facing many countries in the Middle East and North Africa.To track the effects of these and other developments on the economy, the MENA Quarterly Economic Brief provides a real-time review, using high-frequency data, of five countries that are at risk of sluggish economic growth in 2013. 

Better together: a new regional platform to improve public service delivery

Yolanda Tayler's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

World Bank

Whether constructing a new bridge or buying textbooks for a public school, governments around the world constantly purchase a wide variety of goods and services. In the countries of the Middle East and North Africa, these types of public contracts represent between 15 percent and 20 percent of GDP each year, an annual amount equal to tens of billions of US dollars.

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