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Governance

The view from inside Voices & Views

Esther Lee Rosen's picture
Also available in: العربية
        Kim Eun Yeul

Since its big-bang beginning with the “Arab Spring”, the MENA Blog has evolved and grown, featuring various perspectives from economists, young people, political commentators, and leaders in their respective fields. Each has contributed in their own way, inviting readers into their world discussing a diverse range of important issues.

What will it take to enhance Morocco’s competitiveness?

Philippe de Meneval's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

In Morocco, a structural transformation of the economy that will lead to stronger growth and job creation will require a coordinated set of policies in several key areas. It will involve maintaining the stability of the macroeconomic environment, improving the business environment, and developing a trade policy that better supports the competitiveness of Moroccan products. 

Inclusion of women in Yemen’s National Dialogue

Guest Blogger's picture
Also available in: العربية

        Dana Smilie

I had never dreamed of getting the chance to pose a question to a president, but I got my chance a few months ago. In September 2012, Yemeni President Abd Rabbo Mansur al-Hadi paid a visit to Washington DC. Having grown up in Yemen, I was intrigued by his arrival. And as a woman, I wanted to hear about his vision for women’s role in the new Yemen.

What are ALMPs? Can they help me find a job?

Diego Angel-Urdinola's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français

        World Bank | Arne Hoel

A forthcoming World Bank report entitled “Building Effective Employment Services for Unemployed Youth in the Middle East and North Africa”, concludes that in order to help unemployed workers in the region obtain the skills required for the available jobs, there is an urgent need to reform existing employment programs.

Tahar Haddad: A towering figure for women’s rights in Tunisia

Erik Churchill's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
                       Wikimedia Commons

For defenders of women’s rights in Tunisia, the figure of Tahar Haddad looms large. For generations of women’s rights activists in Tunisia, he has been seen as the brains and heart behind the country’s progressive legal status of women. Houda Bouriel, director of the Cultural Center of Tahar Haddad in Tunis, notes that for Haddad, “a society in which women are not liberated is not truly free.”

Are fast-track quotas necessary and sufficient for gender equality in the Middle East & North Africa?

Nina Bhatt's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

        Dana Smilie

As I write from Sana’a, I am thinking “ten percent is not enough.” Few would disagree that more women should be represented in legislatures across the Middle East and North Africa. Yet the best ways to achieve improved outcomes is still being debated.

Yemen at the midpoint to its new future

Wael Zakout's picture
Also available in: العربية
        World Bank | Scott Wallace

This month marks the midpoint of the transition process in Yemen. As agreed upon in the peace initiative in November 2011, the transition will include a national dialogue that brings together a broad geographic and political cross section of the country, the drafting of a new constitution, and concluding with new parliamentary and presidential elections.

Ensuring governance reform in Morocco is not “lost in transition”

Fabian Seiderer's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        World Bank | Arne Hoel

A democratic and social transition is underway in Morocco following popular demonstrations inspired by the regional “Arab Spring,” calling for more democracy, inclusion and shared prosperity. A central feature of the transition will be the strengthening of Morocco’s governance framework, and it has so far led to the revision of the constitution and to new elections.

Fighting poverty in the Arab world: with Soap Operas?

Amina Semlali's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
        Photo Source: Nasib Albitar

If you think you are immune to the lure of a soap opera then try watching an Egyptian soap. At first, you will be amused and perhaps even laugh at all the melodrama, but in the end you will most certainly find yourself wondering: Will Alia expose her evil twin sister? Will Omar learn how to read, propose to his beloved and be accepted by her upper-class family?

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