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Health

The economic impact of the Syrian conflict: Estimate it yourself

Shanta Devarajan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Homs, Syria - ART Production | Shutterstock.com

Everyone agrees that conflicts impose huge costs on economies, including massive destruction of infrastructure and housing, disruption of trade, transport and production, not to mention the loss of lives and widespread human suffering. Yet quantitative estimates of these costs are hard to come by.     

Bank Funding Helps Emergency Programs on the Ground in Yemen

Auke Lootsma's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية


Yemen is facing an unprecedented political, humanitarian, and development crisis. Long the poorest country in the Arab region, over half its population was living below the poverty line before the current conflict worsened. That number has risen steeply, with over 21.5 million people needing humanitarian assistance now—close to 80% of the country’s 28 million people.

Disabled and Forcibly Displaced

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Volunteers carry disabled refugee - Nicolas Economou | Shutterstock.com

In February of this year the Syrian Center for Policy Research issued a report stating that 470,000 Syrians had been killed in the war and 1.9 million wounded. That was 10 months ago and with the intensification of the siege and bombardment of Aleppo and ongoing fighting elsewhere in the country, one can only guess at the current toll. What is clear is that each day of fighting adds to the burden that Syria will have to carry for generations to come, not only in terms of the ever mounting physical destruction but also in caring for the growing daily toll of the physically or mentally disabled that the war produces. All this at a time when half the population--nearly 5 million refugees and 6.6 million Internally Displaced Person (IDPs)--have been torn from their homes; and the country’s medical system is in tatters.

Syrian refugees: A mental health crisis

Omer Karasapan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 kafeinkolik l Shutterstock

The Syrian Civil War is entering its sixth year with no resolution in sight: Even February’s truce may be collapsing as the battle for Aleppo intensifies. There will be more refugees and casualties as civilians flee the violence. With its aerial bombings, car bombs, chemical warfare, the unparalleled brutality of Islamic State, and unrelenting trauma of urban warfare, Syria’s war has seen half a million deaths, over 4 million refugees, and some 7 million internally displaced peoples (IDPs). 

Pro-poor health coverage expands in Egypt

Alaa Hamed's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Amira Nour & Sarah Fouad

After the Arab Spring, Egypt’s health sector went through a shaky transition as seven consecutive Egyptian Ministers of Health struggled to make the sector live up to the revolution’s ideal of a  health sector that would serve to uphold human dignity and social justice. Pre-revolution reforms to the sector had focused on expanding access to essential services in family health and to health insurance coverage. The political environment and the sector’s limited capacity had not, however, made it possible for these pilot schemes to be scaled up properly, with a pro-poor focus.

Twelve reasons why the Arab world needs to pay more attention to early childhood development

Will Stebbins's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 Arne Hoel

Inequality begins early in life. In the Middle East and North Africa region it begins before birth, as prenatal care is not universal, and continues right through early childhood with different levels of access to vital nutrition, health services and early education. Missing out on any one of these key development factors can leave a child at a permanent disadvantage in school and adult life. There is also the risk that inequality entrenched early in life is passed on to the next generation, creating a cycle of poverty. A new World Bank report has calculated the different chances that a child from the region’s poorest 20% of households (least advantaged child) and  a child from the region’s richest 20% of households (most advantaged child) have for healthy development. 

We are all accountable: The health of Palestinians first and foremost

Samira A. Hillis's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Razan was a vibrant, happy girl living in the town of Rafah in the Gaza strip when she was diagnosed with a bone marrow illness not long ago, in November 2014. She needed a bone marrow transplant, a medical procedure available only in Israeli hospitals. Her referral, though urgent, was delayed for 20 days. First, she was directed to the wrong hospital for marrow transplants, and then she was denied financial coverage. The Israeli authorities failed to respond immediately to her parents’ application for an emergency permit to allow her into Israel through the (otherwise impenetrable) Erez crossing. 

Razan died on 25 November. She was just 11 years-old.

Improving quality of care against all odds: a local success story in Jordan

Tamer Samah Rabie's picture
Also available in: العربية
The Sakhra Comprehensive Health Center

The Sakhra Comprehensive Health Center is small and slightly disheveled, with evident resource constraints. Nonetheless, it is teeming with activity and resourcefulness. A sheet on the wall is the “screen” from the previous night’s presentation on the safe use of certain medications. A blue curtain cordons off a corner in the maternal and child unit, providing privacy for nursing mothers. Staff members promptly respond to calls placed over a public address system that was proudly purchased by staff donations. Nestled in one of the poorest regions of Jordan (Ajloun Governorate), the Sakhra Comprehensive Health Center is a bustling hub.

Unemployment May Lead to a New Youth Bulge in Egypt

Jacob Goldston's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
 James Martone l World Bank

After dropping for many years, there has been a recent resurgence of fertility rates in Egypt. A woman born in the 1960s gave birth to an average of 1.4 children by the time she turned 25. Then there came a sharp drop, bottoming out at near 1.1 for women born in the late 1970s. But since then, fertility rates have bounced back, up to an average of 1.2 for women born in the mid to late 1990s.

Djibouti Invests in the First 1,000 Days

Homa-Zahra Fotouhi's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
  Aude Guerrucci

When I visited one of the World Bank’s community sites for its new Social Safety Net program, I wanted to see the progress it had made since my first visit in November 2012.  In the first group session, I sat down with about 15 pregnant women—many of them pregnant for the first time—to hear a trained “role model mother” talk to them about the importance of rest, healthy eating, and breastfeeding. 

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