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Sustainable Communities

Lebanese youth are helping to bring tourism back to Tripoli

Chadi Nachabe's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Alaa Jundi, 27, from Tebbaneh outside Tripoli, Lebanon, didn’t have the chance to continue his education. But he loved the arts and had an ambition was of being an actor one day. After feeling hopeless that he had no opportunities, he took art classes that were part of a World Bank project to build his skills. “At first, I felt this was a dream, I was just participating to fill my time and practice my hobby.” But the skills he learned led him to opening an entertainment company with a colleague to host kids’ birthday parties and events.

Empowering MENA Youth through “the Cloud”

Safaa El-Kogali's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
Tech and Youth in MENA - Ahed Izhiman

When I was your age “checking your mail” meant walking to the post office and collecting letters, “tweet” meant the chirping of a bird, and “cloud” meant rain! Today, we live in a very different world.

#EmpowerHer: Using Technology to Help Women and Young People in Tunisia

Afef Haddad's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


It gives me great pride to continue supporting the mission of the World Bank Group to eliminate poverty in the World and empower disadvantaged people to leverage a limitless potential for advancement.
 
For me, one of the recent bright spots in this mission was seeing some of the brightest young people from poor regions in Tunisia come on stage last month to promote and launch their solutions to help reduce the economic exclusion of both Tunisian women and youth.
 
The sting of economic exclusion is being a young, educated, capable and unemployed person. It means being a woman in an underserved rural area without access to health services and to markets for her products.
 

We’re Working to Help Egypt’s Young People Create More Jobs

Lina Abdelghaffar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français
young Egyptian working in a factory

Forty percent of Egypt’s 104.2 million people are under the age of 18 according to the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS), which means the country needs to create about 42 million jobs in the next 30 years to absorb them. Private sector job creation and entrepreneurship are vital for the country’s future development. The government of Egypt recognizes the importance of immediately creating a business environment that is conducive to entrepreneurship and private sector development.

Forcibly Displaced: How MENA Can Reverse its Human Capital Depreciation

Lili Mottaghi's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


The countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) endure a paradox. They have a highly educated labor force but a large pool of unemployed youth. Whether this contradiction results from uncoordinated economic and educational policies, skill mismatch, low productivity of labor, or anemic demand due to lack of a robust private sector, the ensuing lengthy unemployment and skill depreciation have resulted in disproportionate human capital erosion across the MENA region. MENA countries’ rankings in improving their human capital formation have fallen, acc ording to the human capital index (produced by the World Economic Forum) and in 2017, were among the lowest in the world, close to South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Local elections in Tunisia: an opportunity to give interior regions a fair chance?

Antonius Verheijen's picture
Also available in: Français


Watching party activists pass out election leaflets in Bizerte on Labor Day gave me the first tangible feel that local elections were coming, in an otherwise quite understated campaign. While some may feel disappointed about the relatively low-key process, and even more so with voter turnout, sometimes ‘understated’ is also a good thing: the sense that local elections in Tunisia, the first one since 2011, can be a ‘normal’ political occurrence in a context where democracy is evolving.
Image already added
 
 
 

My journey to Aden

Faiza Hesham's picture
Also available in: العربية
Aden, Yemen - By Ahmad Omar Lajam

In October 2017, I departed on vacation from Amman to Yemen. When I arrived in Aden, my hometown, Aden received me with its sunny and hot weather that melted the icy coating around my intense longing to see the city again and the pain of being away from my family and beloved country for over two and a half years.

Millennials Welcome! Young women are revolutionizing the startup scene despite conflicts in MENA

Tobias Lechtenfeld's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français


Our team at the MENA Youth Platform recently had a conversation about women-and youth-led entrepreneurship in the MENA region, and for which emerging trends to look for. One thing is very clear: the next revolution could look very different.

Bait Sonya: How local solutions lead the way to empower Palestinian Women

Samantha Constant's picture
Also available in: العربية


A few weeks ago, I hiked along a historic path through Arab ar-Rashayida -- a Bedouin village nestled in the central desert foothills of the West Bank – up to a steep cliff overlooking the Dead Sea (and beyond that the Jordan Valley).

After drinking sugary hot tea and taking in the nostalgic view, my tour guide Nidal and I were picked up by our hosts from the Khaima Abu Ismail to head back through the desert (by car) only to be greeted by truck loads of middle school-aged girls and boys.

From marginalization to inclusion: The story of the waste pickers in the West Bank

Amal Faltas's picture

About a decade ago, we started a project to improve solid waste management for waste pickers like Ibrahim and the 840,000 people in the southern West Bank governorates of Bethlehem and Hebron. One of the project components included the closure of the Yatta dumpsite, where illegally dumped and burned household waste was reaching a very unsanitary and hazardous level. 

But here came the challenge. 

While the closure of the dumpsite would mean putting an end to a serious environmental and public health problem, it was terrible news for the waste pickers and their families. It meant that the livelihoods of those families would come to an end. 

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