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November 2008

DM2005 winner to scale up its activities after winning Dubai Award

Scott Poynton's picture

In my last posting, I mentioned the importance of securing new funding to scale up activities. I’ve got some great news to share today and that is that our efforts to secure more financial resources have borne fruit in that we’ve just received news that we’re one of 12 winners of the biennial Dubai Awards.

I Hate Thee but, Alas, I Need Thee

Sina Odugbemi's picture

Each time I attend a meeting where public officials are gathered and the subject of the mass media comes up, the room lights up. The stories of deep frustration with the media simply flow out of them like melted butter out of a jug. The complaints are legion:

  • Those terrible journalists distort my views.
  • The media are instruments of terror...virtually.
  • They don't get anything serious; they are lazy and uninformed.
  • They are in bed with sinister forces, and corrupt proprietors.
  • They are not to be trusted at all.
  • As the discussion progresses, the authoritarian impulse comes out. You hear calls for strict regulation of the mass media in the particular developing country. Yes, the officials say, the media must be brought to heel, reigned in.

Franksgiving - one more lesson from the Great Depression

Ryan Hahn's picture

Faced with the scale of the current financial crisis, many economists have turned to the Great Depression to look for policy lessons. Tyler Cowen, a professor at George Mason University, shared his thoughts on the topic recently in the New York Times. His take? The New Deal Didn’t Always Work, Either. Faced with an unprecedented crisis, Roosevelt experimented with a mix of policies, and some worked and some did not.

China experts to answer questions in live online chat

James I Davison's picture

Amid all the news of the slowing global economy, I’m not sure anyone was too surprised that the World Bank’s latest China economic projections estimate the country’s economic growth, despite remaining relatively strong, will continue to slow in 2009.

The hidden side of globalization

Ryan Hahn's picture

In debates over globalization, much attention is given to so-called 'North-South' relationships. Often, data on 'South-South' exchanges it too limited to say much. A new paper on Global Migration of the Highly Skilled by Theo Dunnewijk of United Nations University helps shed some new light on 'South-South' brain drain/brain strain/brain circulation (Hat tip: Giulio Quaggiotto). Previous datasets had overlooked diasporas of highly skilled workers in these countries:


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