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July 2010

Why has the Malagasy economy not yet collapsed?

Jacques Morisset's picture

After almost one and half year of political instability, the economy is hurt but not dead. 

The formal private sector has revealed timid signs of recovery (far from pre-crisis levels) and the informal sector has been vibrant as the result of the good performance of the primary sector (mostly due to exceptional weather) and rising trade activities in urban centers. 

To see the full update on the Madagascar economy click here

Madagascar - Résumé de la note économique: Juillet 2010

Jacques Morisset's picture

Apres près d’une année et demie de crise politique, l’économie malgache  résiste grâce à la timide reprise du secteur privé, mais notamment au boom du secteur informel. 

Cliquer ici pour accéder à l’article (Madagascar Tribune 21 Juillet, 2010)

India receives US$107 million in loan for statistical capacity building

World Bank Data Team's picture

On June 1, 2010, the World Bank approved a Statistical Strengthening Loan for India of US$107 million. This loan supports institutional and policy based reform by the Government of India to strengthen state statistical systems within a national policy framework. This project was developed to enable States and Union Territories of India to progress towards common national standards for key statistical activities and improve the credibility, timeliness and accuracy of statistics at both central and state levels.

Cash on Delivery: Exploring a Results-Based Approach to Education Aid

Christine Horansky's picture

Around the world, aid from international donors buys textbooks, hires teachers, and opens schools - all worthy and necessary contributions in the fight to educate every child. But largely, the development equation remains fundamentally the same.

A new book presented at the World Bank recently by the Center for Global Development flips that equation on its head with proposed progress-based aid for education. In essence, the idea entails paying a country not for inputs such as pencils or classrooms - but once each child educated passes certain bars such as completion of his or her grade level.

Migration News Roundup: July 23, 2010

Ani Silwal's picture

The $35 laptop?

Ryan Hahn's picture

The Indian Express is reporting that India's Ministry of Human Resource Development is set to launch a $35 laptop:

Looking as stylish as a large i-phone, this $35 “low-cost computing-cum-access device” is a 5/7/9 inch touchscreen gadget packed with internet browsers, PDF reader, video conferencing facilities, open office, sci-lab, media player, remote device management capability, multimedia input-output interface option, and multiple content viewer.

“What do you people have against pedestrians and bicycles?”

Holly Krambeck's picture

It doesn’t happen very often. Thank goodness. But there are times, very rare  times, when in our work, we experience a kind of mid-life crisis, when some external event sparks the realization that we have been traveling down a decision-path for so long, we’ve lost sight of something very important – when we stop and say, how did we get here?

It happened last month -- in Weihai, China’s Shandong Province, where we are working with the municipal government on the development of the city’s first Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lines.


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