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January 2012

Vietnam: Say NO to plastic bags for a prosperous Year of the Dragon

Hoang Duc Minh's picture

Cũng có ở Tiếng việt

 
Pop singer Ngoc Khue and MC My Linh, along with 80 volunteers, took part in a flash mob to support the ‘I Hate Nylon’ project.

These days, when most people in Vietnam stay home to celebrate the Lunar New Year (locally known as Tet holiday), hundreds of Vietnamese youth flocked to the streets of Hanoi, the country’s capital, to work on a community project to reduce plastic bag usage in the city.

The ‘I Hate Nylon’ project (plastic bags are commonly called nylon bags in Vietnam) aims to raise Vietnamese people’s awareness about the dangers of plastic bag usage through several community activities before the Lunar New Year, the biggest holiday in Vietnam when people consume a lot of plastic bags.

Việt Nam: Nói KHÔNG với túi nylon vì một năm con Rồng thịnh vượng

Hoang Duc Minh's picture

Available in English

 
Ca sỹ Ngọc Khuê, MC Mỹ Linh cùng 80 tình nguyện viên, khiêu vũ và tham gia vào dự án "Tôi ghét nilon"

Những ngày này, trong khi đa số người dân ở Việt Nam đang quây quần bên gia đình đón năm mới thì hàng trăm bạn trẻ tại Hà Nội lại lao ra đường để tham gia vào một dự án cộng đồng nhằm giảm thiểu sử dụng túi nylon trong thành phố.

Dự án Tôi Ghét Nylon (túi nhựa là thường được gọi là túi nylon tại Việt Nam) nhằm nâng cao nhận thức của người dân Việt Nam về nguy cơ của việc sử dụng túi nylon thông qua nhiều hoạt động cộng đồng trước Tết Nguyên đán, kỳ nghỉ lớn nhất tại Việt Nam khi người dân tiêu thụ rất nhiều túi nylon.

Dự án được khởi động vào đúng ngày Tết Ông Công, Ông Táo năm nay, là ngày 16/1/2012 theo Dương lịch. Theo truyền thuyết, vào ngày này, ba vị thần bếp núc lại cưỡi cá chép bay về trời và báo cáo những gì chủ nhà đã làm trong năm qua trên những con cá chép. Người dân có thói quen thả ba con cá chép và tro hương xuống hồ nhằm “tiễn ông Táo về trời”. Trước đây - khi túi nylon chưa phổ biến, người dân vẫn thường thả cá bằng bát hoặc chậu. Mấy năm trở lại đây, túi nylon ngày càng được dung nhiều hơn để thay thế. Vì vậy mà sau mỗi dịp Tết Ông Công Ông Táo, các hồ trong thành phố đều tràn ngập túi nylon.

Do the Bank’s Operational Staff Support the Bank’s Research Department?

Martin Ravallion's picture

The quality of development projects depends in part on how well grounded project preparation is in knowledge about what works and what does not. Development practitioners need to be well informed if their projects are to have impact.

The World Bank’s in-house research department—the Development Research Group (DECRG)—is the main unit aiming to supply relevant research findings to Bank operations, as well as to external clients. It is not a large department, accounting for about 1% of the Bank’s administrative budget. But it produces the majority of the Bank’s research, and has a high profile internationally. Indeed, it is often ranked ahead of almost all universities and think tanks in development economics, measured by the quantity of research outputs, downloads and citations to research findings. For example, the highly-regarded and much-watched ranking done by the IDEAS project currently puts DECRG ahead of all but one university. 

Empowering Parents to Improve Schooling: Powerful Evidence from Rural Mexico

Harry A. Patrinos's picture

In a bid to provide quality education for all, several programs to increase accountability in schools have been piloted. So far the evidence is sparse. Recent evaluations suggest that even in rural settings, school autonomy and accountability can help improve learning outcomes. This is further supported by a series of evaluations of programs that attempt to alter the power balance between consumers (parents) and providers of schooling services. Recent studies show that autonomy and accountability can improve education outcomes.

Poverty and the school dropout rate in Nepal

When I started school, my parents earned less than $1 a day. It was hard for them to send their four children, including me, to school. Still, we all went. I’m now 23 and in my last year of a bachelor of science at the Institute of Agriculture and Animal Sciences in Chitwan District in Nepal.

Morocco: When Governance, Transparency, Integrity, Accountability, & Public Procurement Entered the Constitution

Laurence Folliot Lalliot's picture

This post originally appeared on Voices & Views: Middle East & North Africa

Although many events from the Middle East and North Africa region have enjoyed large press coverage and headlines, one has remained, to date, a rather well-kept secret: the inclusion of governance and a dedicated provision on Public Procurement in the new Moroccan Constitution, adopted by referendum on July 1, 2011. In doing so, Morocco has joined the very small list of countries (i.e., South Africa and the Philippines) to grant a constitutional status to this rather technical field, the impact of which will be progressively felt in the world (even outside the small world of procurement lawyers), as it affects how government money is converted into goods and works like roads, schools, vaccines, etc.

Rising Inequality in the United States: Lessons from developing countries

Francisco Ferreira's picture

As the United States prepares for its first presidential election after the Great Recession, inequality has emerged as a central political issue. This is not unremarkable: Americans have historically seemed much less troubled by income differences than, say, Europeans. You may remember a 2004 article by Alberto Alesina, Rafael di Tella and Robert MacCulloch in the Journal of Public Economics, which reported that happiness in the US was much less sensitive to inequality than in Europe.

Tools of the Trade: estimating correct standard errors in small sample cluster studies, another take

Jed Friedman's picture

For many years, researchers have recognized the need to correct standard error estimates for observational dependence within clusters. An earlier post contrasted the typical approach to this matter, the cluster robust standard error (CRSE), and various methods to cluster bootstrap the standard error.

Knowledge Gaps on Innovation for Green Growth

Mark Dutz's picture

Small but sometimes radical new steps toward greener energy and green growth are happening on our stressed planet, but we don’t hear enough about them, nor do we sufficiently explore and share policy lessons.
 

Examples include ‘smart grid’ R&D activities that deploy sensors to gather data on incoming electricity from wind, solar and other renewables with varying power outputs, better management of outages, factoring in the needs of electric vehicles, and installing more energy-efficient power meter usage in homes and offices. At the other end of the spectrum, Husk Power Systems, a company operating in Bihar, India has devised a novel single fuel gasifier for rural electrification based on discarded rice husks – one of India’s most common waste products. Thanks to the risk husks, 60 mini-power plants have now been installed. They  power about 25,000 households in more than 250 villages in rural India. 


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