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April 2012

Universities measuring up

Inger Andersen's picture

World Bank | Arne HoelKnowledge is as vital as oxygen. It drives innovation, allowing economies to grow and countries to prosper. As one of the primary creators and disseminators of knowledge, universities play a critical social role. Their proper management should be a top concern of governments everywhere.  Much as the failure of a major organ affects the entire body, a malfunctioning university system has widespread consequences.

Why Kenya needs a world-class port in Mombasa

Wolfgang Fengler's picture

Suppose all of Kenya’s borders suddenly close. Goods and people can no longer enter or exit the country through the port of Mombasa, Jomo Kenyatta International Airport or roadways. Quickly the lack of fuel brings economic activity—and daily life— to a stand-still. Tea and flowers rot in warehouses, and hotels shut their doors for lack of visitors.

Now imagine a situation where Kenya is trading with the whole world, producing world class products and enriching its citizens: consumers can enjoy cheaper products, and exporters exploit expanded opportunities. Given the choice, which scenario would you pick? 

A more open Kenya is indeed possible. According to the “Growth Commission”, there have been some 15 economies over the last 50 years which managed to grow at the rate of 7 percent a year for more than 15 years. In doing so they were able to move vast numbers of their citizens out of poverty. These countries have a few things in common, including that they embraced the world economy through trade. Openness to trade encouraged international firms to invest. Over time, local firms caught up and eventually became world leaders, such as Samsung.

Collaborative Border Management: A New Approach to an Old Problem

Otaviano Canuto's picture

Perhaps it is not surprising that trade with emerging economies is often more complicated, time consuming, and costly than one would want. In addition to lacking some of the necessary physical infrastructure to transport goods, emerging economies frequently have complex and opaque regulatory requirements that create additional delays and increase transaction costs at their borders.

Investing to build a state

Layali H. Abdeen's picture
A few weeks ago, I attended the launch ceremony of the new Palestine Capital Growth Fund, a subsidiary of the multibillion-dollar, Dubai-based private equity fund Abraaj. I found that many people questioned why Abraaj would operate in the Palestinian Territories. Some would even describe such a move as a pure act of social responsibility. But it is not. At least this is what Tom Speechly , a partner at Abraaj, confirmed during the event. He noted that there are many successful companies in the West Bank and Gaza and they are invested for the profit!

A Top Ten of New Urban Businesses

Dan Hoornweg's picture

We’ve seen cafes, car sharing, cell phones, and social networking products like iPads, proliferate from the world’s rush to urbanize. So what’s next? Following is a list of top ten urban businesses that are likely to flourish over the next few years.

  1. Take Two – Tablets. Just as every television now comes with a remote control, so too will every house and apartment come with a ‘control tablet’. We’ve seen the introduction of tablets as cheap as $40 in rural India. The next push will be a clever city that provides every household with a tablet to check on municipal services, emergency announcements, entertainment, and much more. Once every household has its own tablet, the impact will be enormous. The only question now is which city and companies will take a lead. Best guesses: Kitchener, Canada; Gwangju, South Korea; Bangalore, India; Kunming, China; Rotterdam, Netherlands; Thomson Reuters; RIM; Samsung; DataWind.

Tanzania and Ethiopia – Cracking the growth and jobs conundrum

Merrell Tuck-Primdahl's picture

Growth to job creation to poverty reduction — that would be the ideal dynamic to get countries like Tanzania and Ethiopia on the track toward middle income country status. Yet, a trip to both places earlier last month that was focused on the promise of light manufacturing for Africa made it clear that the production line to prosperity can only be set up with the right incentives, with a smart but selective helping hand from the government.

What's Singapore got to do with it?

Parth Shri Tewari's picture

A daunting development challenge will confront us for the next decade: More than 1 million jobs per month – every month, for a decade or more – will need to be created to raise the living standards of the 2.6 billion who live on less than $2 per day, and the billions who will soon try to enter the paid workforce amid one of the greatest demographic surges in human history.  Job creation in the public sector is expected to be flat, at best, so most of the needed jobs will have to be created by the private sector. But how?

Singapore is one of the world's freest economies. (Photocredit: Flickr, jjcb)Focusing on the macroeconomic agenda is necessary but insufficient.  Most countries have rolled out macro-level reforms, but policymakers increasingly argue that the macro policy agenda must be complemented by targeted growth programs focusing on specific industries and value chains.  Policymakers urgently seek practical solutions to meet the job-creation challenge. 

Imagining our Future Together: A Call for South Asia Artists to Share Your Art!

South Asia's picture


Are you a South Asian artist from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, or Sri Lanka and born in or after 1975?

You are invited to share examples of your work for the exhibition South Asia Artists: Imagining Our Future Together.

Imagining our Future Together is a juried group exhibition that will be on display in throughout South Asia and beyond.

Concept

The concept of the exhibition comes from the realization that cooperation among the countries of South Asia is the key to the region’s success in the 21st century. And what better example of transcending borders and breaking stereotypes can be seen than in art created by emerging artists, some of our society’s most perceptive, creative and genuine minds?

Imagining our Future Together is an opportunity to communicate your experience, feelings and thoughts as visual artist to the rest of the world.

Investing to Build a State

Layali H. Abdeen's picture

A few weeks ago, I attended the launch ceremony of theGaza. City. Photo: © Natalia Cieslik / World Bank new Palestine Capital Growth Fund, a subsidiary of the multibillion-dollar, Dubai-based private equity fund Abraaj. I found that many people questioned why   Abraaj would operate in the Palestinian Territories. Some would even describe such a move as a pure act of  social responsibility. But it is not.


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